Alex Dołgopołow

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Joao
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Alex Dołgopołow

Post autor: Joao » 23 lip 2011, 11:47

Obrazek Alex Dołgopołow

Obrazek
bleacherreport.com

Państwo: Ukraina
Miejsce zamieszkania: Kijów, Ukraina
Data i miejsce urodzenia: 7 listopad 1988, Kijów, Ukraina
Wzrost: 180 cm
Masa ciała: 71 kg
Gra praworęczna, oburęczny backhand
Status profesjonalny: 2006
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jaccol55
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Aleksandr Dolgopolov (Ołeksandr Dołgopołow)

Post autor: jaccol55 » 23 lip 2011, 11:49

Obrazek Aleksandr Dolgopolov (Ołeksandr Dołgopołow) - osiągnięcia

Tytuły w singlu (2)
2012 - Waszyngton
2011 - Umag

Finały w singlu (2)
2012 - Brisbane
2011 - Costa do Sauipe

Tytuły w deblu (1)
2011 - ATP World Tour Masters 1000 Indian Wells (z Malisse)

Finały w deblu (0)
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jaccol55
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Aleksandr Dolgopolov (Ołeksandr Dołgopołow)

Post autor: jaccol55 » 23 lip 2011, 11:49

Obrazek Aleksandr Dolgopolov (Ołeksandr Dołgopołow) - tytuły

#1) Umag 2011

Obrazek

R32 - miał wolną rundę
R16 - Filippo Volandri (ITA) 6-1 6-2
Q - Albert Ramos (ESP) 6-4 6-4
S - Juan Carlos Ferrero (ESP) 6-4 6-4
W - Marin Cilić (CRO) 6-4 3-6 6-3
Art
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Re: Aleksandr Dolgopolov

Post autor: Art » 23 lip 2011, 11:49

2010 NEWCOMERS OF THE YEAR

Alexandr Dolgopolov

Inspired by his father, Oleksandar, a former ATP professional and his coach from a young age until 2008, Alexandr Dolgopolov has declared he has the goal of being World No.1. The Ukrainian announced himself as one of the players to watch in 2011 after breaking into the Top 40 (No. 39) of the South African Airways 2010 ATP Rankings in July, having started the year at World No. 131.

Dolgopolov was strong on his favourite surface clay on the ATP Challenger Tour in Morocco in the first three months of the season, winning the title in Meknes and reaching the finals in Tanger and Marrakech. In May he defeated World No. 13 Fernando Gonzalez to reach the Roland Garros third round and two weeks later reached his first ATP World Tour semi-final in Eastbourne (l. to Llodra). The right hander went on to reach three more quarter-finals in Umag, Moscow and St. Petersburg and finished the season ranked No. 48.
http://www.atpworldtour.com/News/Tennis ... -Year.aspx
Art and Craft

Obrazek

Playing tennis in the air. That’s what it can look like when Alexandr Dolgopolov has it all going, as he did for most of his upset win over No. 4 seed Robin Soderling today. We like to say that certain players have “all the shots,” but Dolgopolov has them all and a few of his own invention. There’s the head high crosscourt backhand that he seems to take directly in front of his body. There’s the whip forehand he hits while hopping in the air. There’s the slice backhand that’s spiced with a little extra sidespin. Plus, there's the usual array of threaded passing shots, sharp returns to the corners, and easy forehand winners. If Lleyton Hewitt had studied ballet—a comical thought if there ever was one—he might have moved and played something like Dolgopolov.

The Ukrainian is the last, and thus far the best, member of the ATP’s Aussie Open youth movement. Dimitrov, Berankis, and Tomic have come and gone. Raonic is playing as I write this. Meanwhile, Dolgopolov, at 22 the elder statesman among these whippersnappers, is through to the quarterfinals. Just when it looked like the top seeds had rendered themselves unbeatable, one of them, Robin Soderling, has been beaten, convincingly. Dolgopolov nicked and sliced and cut and hooked the No. 4 seed until the towering giant finally toppled over.

We’ve been hearing a lot about Dolgopolov’s youth at this event. His father worked as fellow Ukrainian Andrei Medvedev’s coach, and he toted little Oleksandr (he recently Westernized his name) around the world with him. In his post-match interview today, Jim Courier said he had hit with Dolgopolov when he was very little. The kid never missed, Courier said, which was “very annoying.” In his press conference, Dolgopolov said with a smile that his father had coached him until he was 19, at which point they “got tired of each other.” Now he works with Aussie coach Jack Reeder, and he’s been training Down Under since the first week in December.

I’ve mentioned it here before, but I also remember watching Dolgopolov when he was a junior. I was doing a story on Donald Young in 2005 or 2006, so I went to the Orange Bowl and watched the various junior Slam events that year. In those days, Dolgopolov was one of the smaller kids, with a thatch of hair that fell over his forehead. He was all touch, all funk and junk and spin, with the thought process of a Baby Santoro—in other words, more catnip for tennis writers. The problem was, he didn’t seem to enjoy tennis. Half the matches I watched, he appeared to tank, including one horrible performance at junior Wimbledon, in which he seemed to be losing to spite himself, or to spite someone else. I can remember thinking that having enough talent that you didn’t need to work at the game was more curse than blessing. I couldn’t imagine ever seeing the kid at the pro level.

Now he’s backed up that native talent and creativity with the pro fundamentals. He can put the ball away from both sides and defend the baseline. Dolgopolov says it was a matter of organization more than anything else. “He’s done a lot for my physical and mental [game],” Dolgopolov says of Reeder. “I’ve got a lot more solid and consistent. He gave me the right way to play, got my game together.” Leave it to an Aussie to show a kid the right way to play tennis; it’s in the blood down here. Dolgopolov has also cut out one of his (less than pernicious) distractions from tennis, computer programming. He and a friend created an “office game” where you can have “fights.” Now Dolgopolov says he’s “not into it,” and that he mostly likes to just drive his car around. Understandable: It is a Subaru.

For the moment, we’ll have to make do with Dolgopolov’s creativity on a tennis court. That should be plenty. He’s got the athletic genes that are standard now: His father was a tennis player and his mother a gymnast. It makes for a graceful combination. I’m on the Dolgopolov bandwagon again, the way I was back in ’05. Of the young guys I’ve seen here, he’s been the most enjoyable to watch. His five-setter with Soderling today was never a chore to sit through.

The loose and versatile Dolgopolov made it seem, as they say, so easy. His shots, with their occult spins, curved around and away from Soderling, who was constantly one step out of position (“I didn’t play good enough to win,” was the Sod’s simple but accurate assessment afterward). It’s good to know that a kid with the talent to make it look easy ended up working hard enough to get the most out of that potential. Now he'll play another player of similar talent who has worked hard to exploit it, Andy Murray, in the quarters. It should be a pleasure to watch them craft each other into the ground. Though judging by Murray's current form, it will be a tough one to win.

Whatever happens, it's good to see a new face in the big press room, one of a few who have made their debuts there this week. Today Dolgopolov sat in the interview room looking up, a half-smile of amazement on his face as reporters kept filing in. With a young player, it’s a getting to know you process. Journalists cast about for any scrap of information, from what car he drives to the type of computer game he designed to his mother’s whereabouts (she does “nothing much” according to Dolgopolov; I hope that quote doesn’t get back to mom).

In this casting about, we got a memorable quote from him. Someone noted that he's Ukrainian, but he has an Italian manager and an Aussie coach. How did that come about?

“There’s a lot of nice people in the world, so you just meet them all over,” was the answer.

That has nothing to do with tennis or the appealing way that Alexandr Dolgopolov plays it. But’s it’s a nice thought to finish on, nonetheless. I hope the world, and the world of tennis, continues to seem so nice to him.
http://blogs.tennis.com/thewrap/2011/01 ... craft.html
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Re: Aleksandr Dolgopolov

Post autor: DUN I LOVE » 23 lip 2011, 11:50

Australian Open 2011 - pierwszy ćwierćfinał wielkoszlemowy.

Obrazek

Aleksader Dolgopolov był jedną z rewelacji pierwszego tegorocznego turnieju wielkoszlemowego. Ukrainiec w drodze do "ćwiartki" pokonał takich graczy jak Jo-Wilfried Tsonga czy Robin Soderling.

Urodzony w Kijowie zawodnik od dziś może pochwalić się także nowym, rekordowym rankingiem. Olek jest 32 tenisistą świata.
MTT - tytuły (17)
2017 (1) Cincinnati M1000
2016 (1) Sankt Petersburg
2015 (1) Rotterdam
2013 (3) Montreal M1000, Rzym M1000, Dubaj
2012 (1) Toronto M1000
2011 (4) Waszyngton, Belgrad, Miami M1000, San Jose
2010 (2) Wiedeń, Rotterdam
2009 (2) Szanghaj M1000, Eastbourne
2008 (2) US Open, Estoril


MTT - finały (21)
2018 (3) Sankt Petersburg, Stuttgart, Marsylia
2017 (2) Sztokholm, Indian Wells M1000
2016 (2) Newport, Rotterdam
2015 (1) Halle
2014 (1) Tokio
2013 (2) Basel, Kuala Lumpur
2011 (3) WTF, Cincinnati M1000, Rzym M1000
2010 (2) Basel, Marsylia
2009 (4) WTF, Stuttgart, Wimbledon, Madryt M1000
2008 (1) WTF
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jaccol55
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Re: Aleksandr Dolgopolov

Post autor: jaccol55 » 23 lip 2011, 11:50

Rozmowa z października:
Q&A WITH ALEXANDR DOLGOPOLOV

Obrazek

Q: You have increased your ranking nearly 100 spots from the beginning of the year, what would you consider the primary reason for your success this season?
A: First of all, being almost injury free during the whole season. [This is] one of the first injury-free years I’ve had in my career. Plus, I got a lot of confidence last year and now I am playing much more solid in all aspects of my game.

Q: Which victory on the ATP World Tour or at Grand Slam level has meant the most to you this year?

A: It was probably at Roland Garros [in the] first-round against Arnaud Clement. It was my first Grand Slam main draw, as well as my first five-set match, and an important victory, which helped me reach the third-round afterwards.

Q: After sustaining good results on all three major surfaces, what would you consider your favourite surface?

A: My favorite surface for now is the clay, because I have spent 80 per cent of my time playing on it. But not because of [my] results, because of the way I move and I feel a lot more at home on clay, but soon that can change.

Q: Who would you say has been your toughest opponent on the season and why?

A: I think it was the match against Jo-Wilfried Tsonga [at Wimbledon] because I had to finish it injured, and we had a really tough match. The movement on grass was new for me, so I was working a lot to play well there.

Q: How has your life changed back home with your new found success?

A: It didn’t change at all, [because] tennis is not popular in [the] Ukraine, so I’m the same person I was before at home. Same friends, same stuff to do, no additional things because of the success.

Q: Describe how your coach, Jack Reader, has influenced the success in your career?

A: Well he helped me a lot in the game; he helped me improve my head and made me play without injuries. That is very important. First of all we are good friends; it is not a mere coach-player relationship. So I’m happy with it!

Q: What are some of your ranking goals for the end of 2010, and what are you looking to accomplish in 2011?

A: For now the goal in 2010 is to stay in the Top 50 at the end of the year, because now I have some health issues that don’t let me be in top form. Now I already feel a lot better than during the US tournaments. For 2011 the goal is to get [to the] Top 20 and stay there solid, playing good in the Slams and the ATP [World Tour Masters] 1000 [events].

Q: Describe how a typical day of practice would unfold for you?

A: I wake up around 8 am, breakfast, [a] 30-40 minute break, warm up, two hours of practice, shower, lunch, one hour sleep, a snack, two [more] hours practice, a bit of gym, stretching or some running, dinner, and finally relax.

Q: You’ve lost to David Ferrer on two occasions this summer, talk about the challenges of playing the Spaniard, and what you’ll need to do in the future in order to defeat him?

A: First of all I will need to get healthy. Both matches I played I didn’t feel [in] top form with my health, and you have to stay 100 per cent concentrated to beat David [because] he is really solid and fights to the last points of the match. But it was a good experience to play two times with him; I hope next year I can do better against players of this level.

Q: Some of your fans call you “Dolgo,” is that a nickname that you prefer?

A: Well probably they call me that the most, so that’s what I prefer. But actually I have no problem if someone calls me another nickname.

Story reproduced with permission from TennisConnected.com

http://www.atpworldtour.com/News/Tennis ... rview.aspx
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Re: Aleksandr Dolgopolov

Post autor: Joao » 23 lip 2011, 11:51

THE CONSTANT ENTERTAINER

Obrazek
Alexandr Dolgopolov beat Jo-Wilfried Tsonga and Robin Soderling en route to his first
Grand Slam quarter-final at the Australian Open.


As a child, Andre Agassi, Boris Becker and Andrei Medvedev were his play mates. So for Alexandr Dolgopolov Jr., it was always going to be a natural progression to the ATP World Tour.

There is something about Alexandr Dolgopolov Jr. Maybe it is the way his blond pony tail flops as he bounces around the court like the Energizer Bunny. Or could it be his balls? He can hit them early or late, big and hard, fast with spin or off-pace with slice. Dolgopolov plays with a sly, cheeky smile that seems to say ‘catch me if you can’. And the way he jerks his opponents about the court is almost like he is giving them the middle finger.
"Sascha was always travelling with his father and Andrei. So, he was used to being around the top players all the time."
Without a doubt, Dolgopolov’s style is not for the tennis purist. This 22 year old from the Ukraine is definitely new school. His look and game could have very well been created by an Xbox engineer; serve powered by a hard drive add-on and groundstrokes fired by two analog triggers. All said, he is fast-paced and fun to watch. Plus, the players have given him a great nickname, the 'Dog'. Whether he is called that because his family name is hard to pronounce, or because he plays like a dog, nobody knows for sure. One thing that is certain, this kid has star power.

Obrazek

Some players are easy to define; baseliners, all-court, serve and volley. Not the 'Dog'. His tennis would fall under a different category, something like Slash and Burn. Or on an off day, Crash and Burn. If Dolgopolov’s tennis could talk, it might say to an opposing player, “what have you done lately?” And there is that little matter of his shot selection. At first glance it seems insane.
“Normally it depends how comfortable I am feeling in the match,” explains Dolgopolov. “I try to play unpredictable, and make my opponents uncomfortable.”
Even Andy Roddick commented on it after their match in Brisbane.
"I knew that he was aggressive to the point of psychosis," Roddick said to much laughter in a post match press conference.

Dolgopolov rarely gets excited about his great shots. He does not beat his chest, pump his fist, or scream out loud. At best you might catch him toss a wink up at his coach. Or acknowledge the applause of the crowd with a cat-that-ate-the-canary grin. The "Dog" is cool. The James Bond type of cool.
We should have seen him coming. The signs were there all last year. Three set losses to Radek Stepanek, Richard Gasquet and Tomas Berdych. And a five-set thriller which he lost 10-8 to Tsonga at Wimbledon. Then there were wins over Mardy Fish, Fernando Gonzalez, Mikhail Youzhny and Nicolas Almagro. But it was a straight sets loss to Rafael Nadal in Madrid that made the boys in the locker room sit-up straight and pay attention. Dolgopolov did not just play Nadal, but he appeared to tease him. Playing up on the baseline, he went toe-to-toe with Rafa whacking the 'Raging Bull' with inside-out forehands and taunting him with countless drop shots and lobs. For a couple of hours, it looked like Rafa was being controlled by a joystick and not by a 21 year old who's highest ranking to date was World No. 62.

Obrazek

You could say that Alexandr Jr. was born to play tennis. His father, Oleksandr Dolgopolov Sr. (note spelling change at the request of the son) was an excellent player himself on the Soviet national team and then went on to coach Andrei Medvedev to stardom. His mother, Elena, was a medal winning gymnast. Alexandr Jr., called Sascha by his family and close friends, spent more time on the court than in the cradle. At the age of three, the player's lounge on the ATP World Tour was his living room.
“I spent almost one year training under his (Alexandr's) father,” says Max Mirnyi. “His father was a very strict coach, extremely disciplined. And he made sure to teach all the strokes and shots of tennis. Sascha was always on the courts dragging the racquet behind him running after balls. He began to develop at a very young age.”
"If Dolgopolov's father is a clean cut ... then coach Jack Reader is a love-life bohemian."
“Sascha was always travelling with his father and Andrei (Medvedev),” says Orest Tereshchuk, Ukraine’s Davis Cup captain. “So, he was used to being around the top players all the time. And I don’t think he is or has ever been shy of them. He is very comfortable at the top of the game.”
If father wanted son to follow the rules and regulations of a strict training regime, he was in for a spot of trouble. Not only did Alexandr Jr. not want to think inside of the box, but he wanted to be nowhere near it.
“My father is the type of coach that knows very much about tennis,” says Dolgopolov. “He can see how every player should play to get to his maximum potential. He likes results, not effort or anything else. And he does everything he can so results are positive. And he is very disciplined.”
'The Dog' did not want any part of that leash, so he broke free and went it alone. And then along came Jack.

Obrazek

If Dolgopolov’s father is a clean cut, shirt tucked in, strict disciplinarian carrying a stopwatch and a jump rope, then coach Jack Reader is a love-life bohemian with waves of unruly brown hair travelling with a carton of cigarettes and a case of beer. Upon meeting Jack you could almost hear Olexsandr Sr. shout, “Oh my God!”
It seems everybody loves Reader. Check out his Facebook page after Dolgopolov’s great run at the Australian Open and there are well wishes and congratulations in Italian, German, Russian, English and Australian. On the ATP World Tour, Reader can be found after work at the pub nearest the official hotel where you can bet that he is already on a friendly first name basis with everyone from the janitor to the bar maid to the bum on the street.
"Never a dull moment with those two."
So just how did Jack hook up with the 'Dog'? In a strange twist of irony, it began before Dolgopolov was even borne. Twenty-five years ago, Reader left Australia and moved to Europe where he played the pro circuit and club tennis in Germany and Italy. Those that knew Jack back then said he played his tennis matches with one hand on his racquet and the other hand on the ladies. But Reader’s time in Italy gave him more than just the dolce vita, he also formed a relationship with Corrado Tschabuschnig, who would go on to form Topseed Management Company and would many years later become Dolgopolov’s agent.
“In 2005, Jack tells me about this kid with amazing talent,” says Tschabuschnig. “It was a junior named Dolgopolov. It was not long until we signed him. Then in 2009, Dolgopolov split with his father and needed someone. Immediately, I thought of Jack.”

Obrazek

If you thought that Reader is all fun and games, you would be mistaken, super social and self-deprecating yes, careless no. Like a horse whisperer who is trying to soothe a wild mustang, Reader found that in order to get his young charge on track he needed to listen first.
“Jack is very smart as a coach,” claims Dolgopolov. “He is someone who respects your point of view, even though he has his own. He is very communicative, but when we talk tennis he prefers to talk less and listen more. But when he says something it is the right stuff.”
While many coaches attempt to stamp their influence on players right away, Reader took his time and used a ‘players don’t care what you know, unless that they know that you care’ approach. Instantly the two men clicked. The ATP World Tour was about to become “Jack and Sascha’s Excellent Adventure”.
At l'Aéroport Nice Côte d'Azur, France, Jack and Sascha are at the check-in counter waiting for their boarding passes for the flight to Paris. The airline agent stares at Jack and then at Dolgopolov, and back again. Then after consulting with a colleague, he asks them if they have proof that they are a couple. Jack flashes a big sheepish smile, Dolgopolov cringes. The story goes that in an effort to save money on airfare, Reader found a special two-for-one promotional fare on the internet. Just one catch, it was for gay couples only.
“Never a dull moment with those two,” laughs Mirnyi, who witnessed the entire scene.
Jack and Dolgopolov have become much more than just coach and player. They even continue to share a room on the tour.
"He can do practically everything with the ball. His game is very rich. He has many ways to win the point and he is not afraid to go for it."
“There are often a few minutes here and there when we can talk about his matches, or such,” says Reader. “We don’t have big sit down long talks, but rather we communicate bit-by-bit throughout the day. I like being with Sascha. He is a good kid. A real good kid.”
It is the middle of nowhere between Kiev and Moscow and Jack and Alexandr are lost. Instead of flying to Moscow they decided to drive. It should’ve only taken somewhere between twelve to fifteen hours to get there.
“We thought it would be a good chance to slow down a bit,” says Reader. “Talk about things; you know, things about life and not just tennis. And see the country side.”
Well, they certainly got what they wished for. While Dolgopolov has tricked out his Subaru SUV with the latest toys, with Reader sharing the driving a GPS might have been a good idea. Eventually, they made it in time for the President’s Cup.

Obrazek

As last year was ending and this year about to begin, Reader invited Dolgopolov to where else? The beach. In order to get acclimatized to the intense heat of Australia, Dolgopolov cut his holidays in the Ukraine short and travelled to Brisbane. There was plenty of fishing, swimming and surfing, and oh yes, some tennis. As Jack continued to put Alexandr the person first, and the tennis player second, there was a method to his supposed madness. Get Dolgopolov healthy and happy.
“He battled injuries for much of the last two years,” says Reader. “Not big ones, mind you, but little niggles that were constantly interrupting him. And when Sascha is happy and excited to go out and play, then he can do some amazing things on the court.”
"I am so proud of my son. I don’t have enough words to express the joy of how I feel."
Robin Soderling would soon find out in the round of sixteen at the Australian Open. In a match that looked more like a drive-by shooting than a game played by gentlemen, Dolgopolov frustrated the World No. 4 with a barrage of quick strike serves and ballistic forehands. But it was that other stroke that irritated Soderling the most. Technically it is called a slice backhand, but it looks more like something a Sensei would teach in a martial arts class. Aesthetically pleasing no, incredibly effective, yes.
“He can do practically everything with the ball,” says Claudio Pistolesi, Soderling’s coach. “His game is very rich. He has many ways to win the point and he is not afraid to go for it. He has amazing acceleration. He plays very fast and it can be uncomfortable to play against him. Jack (Reader) brought so much to his game, taught him how to mix it up more. But also Jack provided stability. That is easy to say, but tough to do. He (Reader) showed a lot of patience with him.”
“I am not surprised by his performance at the Australian Open,” claims Tereshchuk. “Having seen him play so much over the years, I know what he is capable of doing on a tennis court. He is a very special player.”

Obrazek

It has been nearly 20 years since Olexsandr Sr. looked on proudly as his little Sascha played with the world’s best players while entertaining everyone who passed by. Now it is happening all over again.
“I am so proud of my son,” says Olexsandr Sr. overcome with emotion over the telephone from Kiev. “I don’t have enough words to express the joy of how I feel.”
Of all the things that Dolgopolov’s father gave his son over the years, maybe it was the freedom to let Alexandr Jr. go out on his own that was the greatest gift of all. For he can rest assured that Reader will watch his son’s back, and that all those lessons that he tried to instill in his son were not in vain nor forgotten.
http://www.atpworldtour.com/News/DEUCE- ... polov.aspx
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Re: Aleksandr Dolgopolov

Post autor: DUN I LOVE » 23 lip 2011, 11:51

Finał w ATP Costa do Sauipe

Jest to pierwszy w karierze finał turnieju ATP w wykonaniu młodego Ukraińca. Dolgopolov przegrał mecz o tytuł z Nicolasem Almagro. Dzięki temu osiągnięciu Olek znalazł się wśród 30 najlepszych tenisistów świata. 14.02.2011 roku został sklasyfikowany na 29 miejscu rankingu ATP.
MTT - tytuły (17)
2017 (1) Cincinnati M1000
2016 (1) Sankt Petersburg
2015 (1) Rotterdam
2013 (3) Montreal M1000, Rzym M1000, Dubaj
2012 (1) Toronto M1000
2011 (4) Waszyngton, Belgrad, Miami M1000, San Jose
2010 (2) Wiedeń, Rotterdam
2009 (2) Szanghaj M1000, Eastbourne
2008 (2) US Open, Estoril


MTT - finały (21)
2018 (3) Sankt Petersburg, Stuttgart, Marsylia
2017 (2) Sztokholm, Indian Wells M1000
2016 (2) Newport, Rotterdam
2015 (1) Halle
2014 (1) Tokio
2013 (2) Basel, Kuala Lumpur
2011 (3) WTF, Cincinnati M1000, Rzym M1000
2010 (2) Basel, Marsylia
2009 (4) WTF, Stuttgart, Wimbledon, Madryt M1000
2008 (1) WTF
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Joao
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Re: Aleksandr Dolgopolov

Post autor: Joao » 23 lip 2011, 11:51

18.04.2011 - DOG w Top-20!

Najwyższa pozycja w karierze: 20
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Re: Aleksandr Dolgopolov

Post autor: FEDEER » 23 lip 2011, 11:52

W:11:Memphis-Pekin 12:Barcelona-Monachium 14:Dubai-(IW,Miami,Wimby)-debel 16:Wimby 17: Wimby-debel
F:10:Sztokholm-Cincinnati 11:Estoril-Nicea-Halle-W.Salem-USO-debel 13:Rotterdam- Eastbourne
SF:11:K.Lumpur-Wiedeń 12:Miami 13:Montreal 16:Toronto-Pekin
QF:10:Shanghai-Bercy 11:Brisbane-Sydney-AO-San Jose-Madryt-L.A- Waszyngton-Montreal-USO-Bazyela 12:In.Wells-Rzym 13:Wimby-Hamburg-W.Salem
IO Rio debel-srebro
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Re: Aleksandr Dolgopolov

Post autor: Kubecki » 23 lip 2011, 11:52

Getting to know Alexandr Dolgopolov

Obrazek

Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE Alexandr Dolgopolov of the Ukraine might just be the front-runner for the ATP award for most-improved player this season. Relatively unknown prior to the Australian Open, "Dolgo" stood out in Melbourne when he upset two seeds in a row, first Jo-Wilfried Tsonga and then Robin Soderling, both in five sets, before folding to the future finalist, Andy Murray.

Those exploits propelled him up the rankings from no.50 to no.32, making him a player to watch and leading to the nickname "The Dog" because of his ability to cover the court like a dog hell-bent on chasing the ball. The Ukrainian's new fans have even changed the words of the song "Who let the dogs out?" to "Who let the Dolg out?"

So, is Dolgopolov embarrassed or flattered to be compared to a dog? "It doesn't bother me," he says with a smile. "I actually think it's rather funny."

"The talent of a Federer"

Dolgopolov's game is based on quick switches from defence to offence, a quick-motion service, surprise changes in rhythm and superb drop shots.

After Melbourne, those tactics took him to the final in Costa do Sauipe (l. Almagro) and to the semifinals in Acapulco (l. Ferrer). However, his rise was then slowed by a bout of pancreatitis during the North American leg.

"We lost some momentum in the US," his coach, the Australian Jack Reader, said. "But we had to deal with his health before getting back to business. We're back on track now. Alex can go higher in the rankings. He has the talent of a Federer, I'm sure of it; he just needs to be more consistent."

Following in the footsteps of Medvedev

Reader first spotted Dolgopolov's talent back in 2005, when he was 17 years old, at a Challenger tournament in Modena, but at the time the Ukrainian was being coached by his father Oleksandar Dolgopolov, a former tennis pro who coached Andrei Medvedev all the way to no.4 in the world.

"My father made me the player I am today," acknowledges the younger Dolgopolov. At the time, "Dolgo" was still a child but very much part of Medvedev's happy entourage. "I have great memories of that time. I'd watch Medvedev practice and I'd cheer for him from the stands. He's still close to our family and I hope to reach the same heights he did."

Perhaps at Roland Garros, where Medvedev was a finalist in 1999? It is probably too soon to hope for such results, but we know that this racecar enthusiast is on the fast track to success.
http://www.rolandgarros.com/en_FR/news/ ... 27461.html
MTT - tytuły (10)
2018 (1): Montpellier
2011 (1): US Open
2010 (2): Houston, Metz
2009 (3): Belgrad, Madryt, Stuttgart
2008 (3): Hamburg, Bangkok, Tokio
____________________
2013: Finał Wimbledonu
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Re: Aleksandr Dolgopolov

Post autor: DUN I LOVE » 31 lip 2011, 21:31

#1) Umag 2011

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R32 - miał wolną rundę
R16 - Filippo Volandri (ITA) 6-1 6-2
Q - Albert Ramos (ESP) 6-4 6-4
S - Juan Carlos Ferrero (ESP) 6-4 6-4
W - Marin Cilić (CRO) 6-4 3-6 6-3
MTT - tytuły (17)
2017 (1) Cincinnati M1000
2016 (1) Sankt Petersburg
2015 (1) Rotterdam
2013 (3) Montreal M1000, Rzym M1000, Dubaj
2012 (1) Toronto M1000
2011 (4) Waszyngton, Belgrad, Miami M1000, San Jose
2010 (2) Wiedeń, Rotterdam
2009 (2) Szanghaj M1000, Eastbourne
2008 (2) US Open, Estoril


MTT - finały (21)
2018 (3) Sankt Petersburg, Stuttgart, Marsylia
2017 (2) Sztokholm, Indian Wells M1000
2016 (2) Newport, Rotterdam
2015 (1) Halle
2014 (1) Tokio
2013 (2) Basel, Kuala Lumpur
2011 (3) WTF, Cincinnati M1000, Rzym M1000
2010 (2) Basel, Marsylia
2009 (4) WTF, Stuttgart, Wimbledon, Madryt M1000
2008 (1) WTF
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Wujek Toni
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Re: Aleksandr Dolgopolov

Post autor: Wujek Toni » 01 sie 2011, 12:00

Dolgopolov Denies Cilic To Capture First Title

Obrazek
Alexandr Dolgopolov was the
sixth first-time winner on the
ATP World Tour this season.


Second seed Alexandr Dolgopolov became the sixth first-time winner on the ATP World Tour this season when he defeated home favourite and fourth seed Marin Cilic 6-4, 3-6, 6-3 in Sunday’s final at the ATP Studena Croatia Open in Umag.

The 22-year-old Dolgopolov had finished runner-up to Nicolas Almagro in his first ATP World Tour final on clay in Costa do Sauipe in February. By winning the ATP World Tour 250 clay-court tournament, he received 250 South African Airways 2011 ATP Rankings points and €72,600 in prize money. He is the second Ukrainian winner in Umag, following Dimitri Poliakov's victory 20 years ago.

The five other first-time winners captured their titles in the first four months of the season, with Kevin Anderson winning in Johannesburg, Ivan Dodig winning in Zagreb, Milos Raonic winning in San Jose, Pablo Andujar winning in Casablanca and Ryan Sweeting winning in Houston.

"I was first in the rankings in Ukraine, but I hadn’t won a title and everyone was talking about that a bit," said Dolgopolov. "So I’m really happy that I eventually did win it, because I was playing pretty well for a year, but still I couldn’t manage to win a title. It’s a good moment. I’ll keep on working and try and get higher and higher in the rankings."

World No. 26 Dolgopolov came into his second Umag appearance on a poor run of form, having lost his past four matches. However, the right-hander hit his stride in Croatia, not dropping a set en route to the final, including victory over defending champion Juan Carlos Ferrero in the semi-finals.

In his first meeting with Cilic, Dolgopolov was strong on serve in the first set, winning 90 per cent of points behind his first serve, and converted one of his four break points to take the opener. With his sights set on winning a third ATP World Tour title on home soil, Cilic hit back to take the second set, but quickly fell behind a break in the third set. The fourth seed drew level at 3-3, but Dolgopolov soon regained the advantage and reeled off the final three games of the match to prevail in two hours and 14 minutes.

"It was a tough match," reflected Dolgopolov. "I got a bit nervous at the end and it was a nervous third set, so I’m happy I could win it. The key of the match was that I was playing my game, not waiting for him to make errors and I was doing that pretty well until I got a bit nervous. I think I was playing the right game, attacking a lot, making him run and it paid off."

Kiev-born Dolgopolov began the year at No. 48 in the South African Airways 2011 ATP Rankings, but has made significant strides in the past seven months thanks to a quarter-final exit at the Australian Open (l. to Murray) and semi-final efforts in Acapulco (l. to Ferrer) and Nice (l. to Hanescu) to add to his final showing in Costa do Sauipe.

The 22-year-old Cilic was bidding to become the first Croatian winner in Umag since the tournament’s inaugural edition in 1990, when Goran Prpic defeated Goran Ivanisevic. The right-hander dropped to a 5-5 mark in ATP World Tour finals; he was looking to win his first trophy since winning the second of his two titles in Zagreb last February (d. Berrer).

"I’m really pleased with the way things went this week," said Cilic. "We haven’t had a Croatian in the final here for 21 years and it was a relief I think for all the tournament organisers and also for me to reach the final and be playing well at home."
http://www.atpworldtour.com/News/Tennis ... Title.aspx
"Zabrałem kiedyś Rafaela wraz z Pico Monaco na ryby. Pamiętam, że chłopcy niezwykle radowali się na myśl o spędzeniu w taki sposób tamtego poranka - lato miało się już ku końcowi i była to jedna z ostatni okazji, by złowić kilka moren przed zamknięciem sezonu. Przypominam sobie bardzo dokładnie moment, gdy Rafael próbował po raz pierwszy zarzucić swoją wędkę , siedząc na skraju barki. Samą czynność wykonał nienagannie - widać było gołym okiem, że chłopak ma do wędkarstwa talent i czerpie z niego wielką przyjemność. Mimo to nie omieszkałem zbliżyć się do mojego bratanka, po czym chwyciłem go dosyć łagodnie, acz pewnie za muskularne prawe ramię, którym to przed chwilą zarzucił energicznie żyłkę wraz ze spławikiem i rzekłem: 'Którą ręką Cię uczyłem?'" Toni Nadal, Życie moje
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Re: Aleksandr Dolgopolov

Post autor: jaccol55 » 01 sie 2011, 14:13

FIRST-TIME WINNER SPOTLIGHT ALEXANDR DOLGOPOLOV

Obrazek
Alexandr Dolgopolov was contesting
his second ATP World Tour final.


Second seed Alexandr Dolgopolov became the sixth first-time winner on the ATP World Tour this season when he defeated home favourite and fourth seed Marin Cilic 6-4, 3-6, 6-3 in Sunday’s final at the ATP Studena Croatia Open in Umag. ATPWorldTour.com caught up with the new champion following his victory.

How does it feel to win your first ATP World Tour title?
I’ve played pretty well for the last year, but couldn’t manage to get a win. I think it’s good because I worked hard to get to the final and then I managed to win it, so I’m really happy. I was first in the rankings in Ukraine, but I hadn’t won a title and everyone was talking about that a bit. It’s a good moment. I’ll keep on working and try and get higher and higher in the rankings.

It’s been just over an hour since you won, how many text messages have you received?
Around 20 from my friends and people I know in the Ukraine.

How did your approach to this final differ compared to the one in Costa do Sauipe?
I think I was a bit more confident because I didn’t lose a set until the final. I know my game pretty well now. The conditions suited me and it was the right day. I think my form was a bit better.

Talking about your season overall, how happy have you been with the highlights?
I’m really happy with the season. The clay-court campaign (in the spring) could have been better; I was playing pretty solid at a lot of tournaments but couldn’t win anything. I hope to get better and come back.

Did you think your first title would come on clay? What’s your favourite surface?
Pretty much clay, but I wasn’t thinking about my first title. I was concentrating more on the ranking and stuff like that.

Is your goal still to reach the Top 20 at the end of the year?
Yeah, pretty much. If you are Top 20, or better Top 15, you can really plan your year better. You are able to practise more because if you are down at No. 30 or No. 40 you need to play more than practise, which makes it tough. For sure I would like to reach the Top 15 then go from there.

What are your hobbies? What do you like to do off court?
I like to spend time with my friends and I like to race cars. That’s pretty much it. I just get back, do what normal people do - go out, go bowling, play baseball and just forget about tennis.
http://www.atpworldtour.com/News/Tennis ... polov.aspx
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Re: Aleksandr Dolgopolov

Post autor: DUN I LOVE » 01 sie 2011, 16:46

MTT - tytuły (17)
2017 (1) Cincinnati M1000
2016 (1) Sankt Petersburg
2015 (1) Rotterdam
2013 (3) Montreal M1000, Rzym M1000, Dubaj
2012 (1) Toronto M1000
2011 (4) Waszyngton, Belgrad, Miami M1000, San Jose
2010 (2) Wiedeń, Rotterdam
2009 (2) Szanghaj M1000, Eastbourne
2008 (2) US Open, Estoril


MTT - finały (21)
2018 (3) Sankt Petersburg, Stuttgart, Marsylia
2017 (2) Sztokholm, Indian Wells M1000
2016 (2) Newport, Rotterdam
2015 (1) Halle
2014 (1) Tokio
2013 (2) Basel, Kuala Lumpur
2011 (3) WTF, Cincinnati M1000, Rzym M1000
2010 (2) Basel, Marsylia
2009 (4) WTF, Stuttgart, Wimbledon, Madryt M1000
2008 (1) WTF
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Re: Aleksandr Dolgopolov

Post autor: jaccol55 » 10 sie 2011, 9:27

DOLGOPOLOV RESPONDS TO FACEBOOK QUESTIONS

Obrazek
'Dog' has no plans to change
hairstyles anytime soon.


World No. 21 Alexandr Dolgopolov, who claimed his first ATP World Tour title in July at the ATP Studena Croatia Open in Umag, answers questions from Facebook fans. The Ukranian won his first-round match at the Rogers Cup in Montreal on Monday.

You looked very comfortable interviewing the hostesses in Umag? How were you able to remain focused on tennis and go on to win the title?-Djohno

I went out for two nights, so it was not too much for me. I was still playing good and the matches didn’t start until 5:30 pm, so I was fine to play.

Are you comfortable with your nickname, Dog? How often do you hear the chant: “Who let the dogs out? Hoo, hoo, hoo!”-Tenfred

Haha! I haven’t heard that since Australia. I’m fine with that nickname… not many people use it.

Hey Dolgo - You have a very interesting service motion, notably how quick you hit the ball after you toss. Who taught you to serve like that and how is it effective for you?-Nick Leone

I think it’s pretty effective because because my opponent can’t really read the serve. No one really taught me. I had a normal technique growing up and I just started jumping out hitting the ball faster.

What is your favourite tennis tournament?-Ally Lodge

My favourite tournament would probably be Roland Garros.

Do you have a habitual routine before a match, like brushing your hair many times, or swaying your racquet back and forth?-Sigourney Musca

Nope, no routine. I just relax before I go on court.

Who is your favourite player in the Top 10?-Fefee Tennis

That’s tough. I don’t have one. I’m not in the Top 10 yet (laughter). Seriously though, I don’t have a favourite. I like all of them.

Congratulations for your first title, Do you think you'll change your hairstyle anytime soon? If you do (or ever do), whose hairstyle among the ATP players do you think you'll mostly want to be looked like?-Hanny Hou

I’m not sure I’d want to look like someone on the tour. It would probably be something normal but I won’t change it soon

Would you ever hold a charity benefit in which you would allow your hair to be completely shaved off if the shaver paid enough to your favourite charity?-Michael 'Pablo' Weigel

I’ve never thought about it but it would be possible I guess.

What is your maximum service speed km/hr ?-Hilton Jay Cutler

I think it was 232km/hr from what I saw.

With the US Open coming up, I want to know if there's anything you do different to prepare for the four major tournaments as opposed to the other tournaments during the year? Congrats on the first title! I was thrilled :)-Paula Colburn

Thanks! I don’t think I do anything special for the four majors. I prepare pretty much the same and try to peak during the Grand Slams.
http://www.atpworldtour.com/News/Tennis ... tions.aspx
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Re: Aleksandr Dolgopolov (Ołeksandr Dołgopołow)

Post autor: jaccol55 » 05 wrz 2011, 22:53

Artykuł o Dogu z sierpnia tego roku.
The breath of fresh air that is Alexandr Dolgopolov

Obrazek
Dolgopolov beat Marin Cilic to win his first ATP title in Croatia last week.

The young man from the Ukraine has enjoyed a variety of names. Oleksandr changed to Alexandr to differentiate from his father. Amongst family and friends he is Sascha. To fans and colleagues he is Dolgo or, simply, The Dog. But the name engraved last week on his first ATP trophy will say Dolgopolov.

The landmark win for the 22-year-old came at the Croatian Open in Umag where he beat defending champion, Juan Carlos Ferrero, in the semis and former top-10 Marin Cilic in the final. Judging by his previous four tournaments—which produced just a single win—it might have been seen as unexpected. But take that backward look.

At the beginning of 2010, Dolgopolov was ranked 131 in the world, itself a rise of almost 200 places during 2009. A string of good Challenger events—two finals in February alone—quickly signalled an imminent breakthrough, and he reached another Challenger final in March before qualifying for both the Monte Carlo and Madrid Masters.

By the time he played in his first Grand Slam main draw at Roland Garros, where victories over Arnaud Clement and Fernando Gonzalez took him to the third round, his unconventional look and shot-production were being noticed.

Next, he captivated British audiences as he transitioned his fresh style to the grass, reaching the semi-finals at Eastbourne. Then he played what he has since described as a breakthrough match against Jo-Wilfried Tsonga at Wimbledon.

From two sets down, he levelled his second-round match, 7-6, 7-5, before losing the fifth 8-10. David against this particular Goliath may have narrowly lost but he fired 29 aces past Tsonga during the four-hour trial of strength and rose to No40 for his pains.

Come the American hard courts and David did knock down some big names—Philipp Petzschner and Mikhail Youzhny—before losing to Tomas Berdych in three sets in Toronto. Later in the year, he got the better of Marcos Baghdatis and Nicolas Almagro, too, but failed to go deep in any more events.

However, the promise had been made, the hard hours played—30 events and 74 matches—and, with his 22nd birthday and the turn of the year, the Dog Star continued to rise.

Indeed Dolgopolov opened 2011 in remarkable form. In an attention-grabbing run at the Australian Open, he turned the tables on Tsonga in the third round in another five-setter. This time, he came back from a two-sets-to-one deficit with a storming 6-1, 6-1 finish. But what captured the headlines was his fourth-round defeat of a stunned Robin Soderling.

Then world No4, the Swede took the opening set 6-1, but as Dolgopolov got the measure of his opponent’s game, he began to weave the now familiar energetic spell, upping the tempo both between and during points, running Soderling ragged with unexpected drops, angles and spin.

The Ukrainian won the next two sets but Soderling levelled in the fourth and it looked as though Dolgopolov, with one five-setter already in his legs, may run out of steam. Not a bit of it. He regained his concentration and a befuddled Soderling, who thrives on a rhythmic power game, saw the set and the match whisked out of his control, 6-2.

Against Andy Murray in the quarters, things were more complicated: The Murray return of serve applied constant pressure to Dolgopolov, yielding 18 break points, but even so, the Ukrainian pulled out a third-set tie-breaker before Murray applied the killer blow in the fourth.

The Dolgopolov run took him to the top 30, and a return to clay during the South American “golden swing” brought still more success: a first ATP final in Brazil and a semi-final place in Acacpulco. On the hard courts, he again beat Tsonga in Miami, and back on clay in Nice, he reached the semis by taking out the formidable David Ferrer.

The early summer proved less successful, not helped by treatment for pancreatitis, but Dolgopolov, now fighting fit again, has taken that first title.
So there have been impressive advances in the Ukrainian man’s game, from the nether reaches of 370 in mid-2009 to 21 now. But a further backward look, beyond 2009, reveals a second strand to this story.

Two years earlier, at 18 and in his first year as a pro, Dolgopolov was already inside the 200 before a slide in 2008 back to 470. The young player was troubled by a series of health and fitness problems but he also had to resolve a less-than-perfect coaching relationship with his father.

Oleksandr Dolgopolov Sr had played tennis for the Soviet national team and went on to coach Andrei Medvedev. His wife was a European gold-medallist in gymnastics. With such genes and expertise behind him, it was little wonder that Dolgopolov Jr took to tennis so early.

However, as the son advanced through his teenage years, the highly disciplined coaching approach of his father began to conflict with young man’s less than conventional playing style.

By 2008, something had to give and that was when Dolgopolov Jr got his second helping of good fortune: Jack Reader. The Australian joined forces with Dolgopolov at the start of 2009 and straight away they fitted one another like hand and glove. As Robert Davis observed in Deuce magazine in February, “the two men clicked.”

Dolgopolov explained it thus to Davis: “He is someone who respects your point of view. He is very communicative but when we talk tennis he prefers to talk less and listen more.”

Reader was relaxed, a listener, a “reader” of his new charge. Rather than inhibit the young man’s unconventional approach to playing tennis, Reader worked with it, guiding Dolgopolov’s physical and mental development while allowing him the space to pursue his natural style.

He also started to scout opponents, feed back the information and let Dolgopolov play how he thought best. As he told Tom Perrotta in the Wall Street Journal: “My job is to tell Alex what they’re generally doing and what he can do to counteract it.”

Since the Umag win, Dolgopolov has spoken to the ATP about the relationship: “He helped me improve my head and made me play without injuries. That is very important. First of all we are good friends: It is not a mere coach-player relationship. So I’m happy with it!”

In fact words, when it comes to watching Sascha talk about his coach/friend, are superfluous: His face automatically breaks into a huge smile.

But mention of injuries is interesting. Dolgopolov’s first title may have come on clay but his biggest matches of the last 12 months have, arguably, come on hard courts, and his own website now says: “His aggressive tennis suits best hard courts.

In the past he preferred playing on clay, in order to prevent injuries to his knees. Now that he finished growing, the knees have become strong and stable and he is able to compete on hard courts for longer periods of time.”

With Montreal, Cincinnati and New York around the corner, and few points to defend, that could be highly significant for the rest of the Ukrainian’s year.

The success of the player/coach partnership has had another payoff: a renewed closeness between father and son. Dolgopolov’s ATP bio claims that his father is the most inspirational person in his life for helping him become the tennis player that he is. Meanwhile, his father told Davis: “I am so proud of my son. I don’t have enough words to express the joy of how I feel.”

So all seems right with the Dolgopolov’s world—and that can only be good news for fans of his uninhibited style and unconventional tennis. For this slight, 157lb breath of fresh air brings a different perspective to the tennis scene.

His game has something of Russian roulette about it. What shapes up to be a cross-court backhand may turn into a top-spin drive down the line or a drop shot with the kind of spin that turns the ball like a boomerang. He has a creativity and an unpredictability that inspire an audience and befuddle an opponent.

The deception does not always work, of course. His can rush at a set like a bull in a China shop, concede an opening advantage but then find a string of outright winners that turn game, then set and finally match on its head.

Such a style brings its frustrations, but it’s fun and it’s inspiring and it comes packaged in a personality who seems, for the moment at least, to combine the uninhibited zest of a teenager with the balanced head of a mature competitor.

It’s a delicate balance to achieve—to iron out the troughs without dampening the fireworks—and it’s a balance in which both father and coach have probably played a part.
http://www.thesportreview.com/tsr/2011/ ... v-feature/
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Re: Aleksandr Dolgopolov (Ołeksandr Dołgopołow)

Post autor: Ranger » 06 wrz 2011, 15:29

Tekst z powyższej konferencji prasowej:
Spoiler:
Źródło: http://www.usopen.org/en_US/news/interv ... 72047.html
Tytuły (12):
2018: Doha, Pekin
2017: Szanghaj, Bazylea
2016: Queen's Club, Atlanta
2014: Pekin
2013: Montpellier, Atlanta
2012: Kuala Lumpur, Szanghaj, Bazylea

Finały (17):
2018: Dubaj, Umag
2017: Sofia, Barcelona, s-Hertogenbosch', Wimbledon
2016: Genewa, s-Hertogenbosch
2013: Barcelona, Madryt, Paryż - Bercy
2012: Dubaj, Estoril, Madryt, Rzym, Nicea
2011: Los Angeles

Gra podwójna:

Tytuły (5): Wimbledon’13, Australian Open’15, Roland Garros’15, Us Open'17, MTT Finals'18
Finały (3): Us Open’15, Wimbledon’16, US Open'18
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Re: Aleksandr Dolgopolov (Ołeksandr Dołgopołow)

Post autor: robpal » 26 wrz 2011, 17:55

26.09.2011

Najwyższa pozycja w karierze: 19
http://www.sportowefakty.pl/tenis

MTT career highlights (16-10):

2018: Paryż (F), Bazylea (F), Metz (W), Toronto (W), Estoril (F), Miami (W), Australian Open (F);
2017: WTF (W), Sztokholm (W), Hamburg (W), Stuttgart (W), Acapulco (W);
2016: WTF (F), Bazylea (F), Cincinnati (W), Roland Garros (F), Marsylia (W), Doha (W);
2015: WTF (W), Bazylea (W), Winston-Salem (W), Hamburg (W), Wimbledon (F), Stuttgart (W), Monte Carlo (F), Indian Wells (F);
2014: Halle (F)
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