mtenis.com.pl

mtenis.com.pl

Forum tenisowe ATP
Dzisiaj jest 21 cze 2018, 4:49

Strefa czasowa UTC+2godz.




Nowy temat Odpowiedz w temacie  [ Posty: 363 ]  Przejdź na stronę Poprzednia  1 ... 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17 ... 19  Następna
Autor Wiadomość
PostZamieszczono: 10 wrz 2012, 15:21 
Offline
Awatar użytkownika

Rejestracja: 18 lip 2011, 23:21
Posty: 1654


_________________
MTT GOAT, 144 weeks #1, 2010, 2011, 2012 Year-end no. 1
W: LA 08, Dubaj 09, New Heaven 09, Bangkok 09, Pekin 09, Madryt 10, Roland Garros 10, Barcelona 11, Madryt 11, Roland Garros 11, Cincinnati 11, Paryż-Bercy 11, Monte Carlo 12, Tokio 12, Dusseldorf 14
F: Olympic Games 08, Bangkok 08, s'Hertogenbosch 10, Wimbledon 10, LA 10, Memphis 11, Waszyngton 11, Montreal 11, Szanghaj 12, WTF 12, Madryt 14


Na górę
 Wyświetl profil  
 
PostZamieszczono: 11 wrz 2012, 15:04 
Offline
Awatar użytkownika

Rejestracja: 01 sie 2011, 9:05
Posty: 4342
Obrazek

_________________
Tytuły (11):
2018: Doha
2017: Szanghaj, Bazylea
2016: Queen's Club, Atlanta
2014: Pekin
2013: Montpellier, Atlanta
2012: Kuala Lumpur, Szanghaj, Bazylea

Finały (16):
2018: Dubaj,
2017: Sofia, Barcelona, s-Hertogenbosch', Wimbledon
2016: Genewa, s-Hertogenbosch
2013: Barcelona, Madryt, Paryż - Bercy
2012: Dubaj, Estoril, Madryt, Rzym, Nicea
2011: Los Angeles

Gra podwójna:

Tytuły (4): Wimbledon’13, Australian Open’15, Roland Garros’15, Us Open'17
Finały (2): Us Open’15, Wimbledon’16


Na górę
 Wyświetl profil  
 
PostZamieszczono: 12 wrz 2012, 1:43 
Offline

Rejestracja: 02 sie 2011, 17:20
Posty: 2768
Cytuj:
Roddick, at a Loss for Words, Leaves Behind a Career of Superlatives

Obrazek
Andy Roddick pushed into the fourth round of the Open before losing in four sets to Juan Martín del Potro on Wednesday in the completion of a suspended match


It looked quite misleadingly like business as usual at the United States Open on Wednesday: Andy Roddick with a microphone in his hand and sweat dripping off the bill of his cap onto the blue court inside Arthur Ashe Stadium.

Roddick, after all, has long been the tennis world’s leading blacksmith and wordsmith — a champion defined by his work ethic and his wit, as well as that quick and brutally effective service motion.

It has been quite a combination for 12 years, long enough for Roddick to win 612 tour singles matches and 32 singles titles, including the 2003 United States Open. Long enough to reach No. 1 and four other Grand Slam singles finals, three at Wimbledon and one here at Flushing Meadows in 2006. Long enough to commit to Davis Cup match after Davis Cup match to the occasional detriment of his individual pursuits and win that team competition in 2007.

Roddick had an exceedingly tough act to follow when he broke into the professional game in the wake of the great American generation led by Pete Sampras and Andre Agassi. He was unable to scale the same heights, but following Roddick’s act will be no short forehand to the open court either. And it is now time — bittersweet though it felt Wednesday — for the next, and for now much less distinguished, American generation to take on that burden.

“I think Andy should look back at his career and feel very proud of what he’s been able to do and how he’s done it,” Sampras said in a telephone interview. “You could say he was handed a tough hand, but he played it well.”

After determining in the midst of his first-round victory here that this would be his last tournament, Roddick pushed into the fourth round before losing to Juan Martín del Potro, 6-7 (1), 7-6 (4), 6-2, 6-4, in a match that was suspended because of rain at 6-6 in the first set Tuesday night and then completed on a muggy afternoon in which the frequently subdued atmosphere was not quite equal to the occasion.

Roddick, seeded 20th at age 30, did his part to make his final Open act compelling, giving del Potro, the seventh seed, plenty of different looks and spins. He mixed huge forehands with crisply sliced backhands that forced the 6-foot-6 Argentine to bend low to extend the rallies.

Roddick also provided plenty of the aggression that some of his coaches have wanted to see more of through the years. There were high-risk approach shots, lunging drop volley winners and overheads that brooked no argument. As fans watched him at work with no guarantee of future opportunities, it seemed important to savor the details: the twirl of his racket before launching into his service motion; the exaggerated puff of his cheeks on impact; the no-look point for the towel that, in light of his elevated perspiration rate, has always been more necessity than crutch.

Roddick, on edge and competitive to the marrow, has long had nervous energy to burn, but del Potro, a fearsome ball striker with a mild-mannered demeanor, can produce more power from more places and positions than Roddick and already had beaten Roddick in three of their four previous matches.

Del Potro, too, won the United States Open when he was only 20 years old. That was in 2009, and in the end, his consistent depth and force snuffed out Roddick’s chances of extending his final run in New York to a quarterfinal match with Novak Djokovic on Thursday.

Roddick saved one match point, perhaps better termed a career point, at 3-5 on his serve in the final set when del Potro missed a forehand return.

But he could not stop del Potro from serving out the match at love in the next game. It ended with Roddick running to his right and looping a topspin forehand long, and it ended with him fighting back tears and, even more unusually, struggling for words.

Del Potro was the first to be interviewed on court, but he quickly and gracefully stepped aside and offered the floor to Roddick, who was soon handed the microphone as his wife, Brooklyn Decker, cried in the stands, seeking support on the shoulder of Roddick’s longtime trainer, Doug Spreen.

“For the first time in my career, I’m not sure what to say,” Roddick said to the crowd. “My gosh. Where do I start? Since I was a kid I’ve been coming to this tournament and I felt lucky just to sit where all of you are sitting today, to watch this game, to see the champions that have come and gone. I’ve loved every minute of it.”

But the words soon came easier for Roddick at his postmatch news conference, a setting where he has often looked more at ease after big matches in the age of Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal than he has during many a match against Federer and Nadal.

“The thing that is certain is I didn’t take anything for granted,” Roddick said. “You know, I think I went about things the right way. The umpires might disagree with me. You know, I was consistent, and I don’t feel like I left a lot on the table on a daily basis. When I look back, that’s probably what I’m most proud of.”

His one Grand Slam singles title came early at the United States Open in 2003, the same year he finished No. 1 and just a year after Sampras won the 2002 United States Open in his final match. But the transition, which looked smooth at first, quickly turned bumpy with Federer’s and then Nadal’s rise to greatness. But Roddick, still a young man, kept hustling and searching for solutions despite the disappointments, none bigger than his defeat in the epic 2009 Wimbledon final to Federer, who defeated him, 16-14, in the fifth set.

“In my own eyes, I see Andy as a multiple Slam winner,” Agassi said in a telephone interview. “He’s obviously come along in what I think history will say is the golden age of tennis and he’s had to deal with that, but at the same time he also has made his own impact. He’s created some incredible memories.”

Roddick’s exit leaves American tennis without a bona fide men’s singles star. He was the last American man to win a Grand Slam singles title, and no American man currently competing on the main tour has reached even a Grand Slam singles semifinal.

“It is a little thin, unfortunately,” Sampras said. “Andy really is the last truly great American player. No disrespect to the guys playing now but they are not quite to the level where Andy was. It goes in phases. Hopefully John Isner and some of these young guys can come through.”

Roddick has done his part to help that group: advising them, encouraging them, training with them on the road and at his home in Austin, Tex. But the longtime leader of the American men’s game is now a retiree and Agassi, who retired in 2006, thinks that Roddick’s next act will be the richer for all the lows that have accompanied the highs.

“I’m sure he feels that he wishes one or two things could have gone differently in his career,” Agassi said. “But I’ve got to say looking from the outside, listening to him talk now, listening to his clarity and his decision-making, knowing him as a person, I also believe those hard times, those unfortunate moments, the losses and never getting back to what he had so early on, has really helped sort of mold him as a person. And I think ultimately that’s a greater gift than adding another trophy to the shelf, because he’s more prepared for the majority of his life as a result of that than otherwise. I assure you that those hard lessons they come with a gift.”

This article has been revised to reflect the following correction:

Correction: September 6, 2012

An earlier version of the picture caption with this article misstated how many sets Andy Roddick and Juan Martin del Potro played. It was four sets, not five.


http://www.nytimes.com/2012/09/06/sport ... ref=tennis

_________________
http://www.sportowefakty.pl/tenis

MTT Rank -4 (High Rank -2)

W: Winston-Salem '14 Newport '14 Brisbane '14 Shanghai '13 Beijing '13 Wimbledon '12 Rome '12 Madrid '12 Basel '11 Dubai '11 Sydney '11 Kuala Lumpur '10
F: Bercy'14 AO '14 Eastbourne '12 Barcelona '12 Munich '12 Beijing '11 Bercy '09
SF: Barcelona '14 Stockholm '13 Paris-Bercy '12 Toronto '12 Vienna '11 LA '11 Valencia '10 Moscow '10 Hamburg '10 Belgrade '10 Brisbane '10


Na górę
 Wyświetl profil  
 
PostZamieszczono: 12 wrz 2012, 1:55 
Offline

Rejestracja: 02 sie 2011, 17:20
Posty: 2768
Cytuj:
The eight most memorable moments of Andy Roddick’s career

Obrazek

At about 6 p.m. ET Wednesday, six days after his blockbuster announcement that he was retiring after the U.S. Open, Andy Roddick's farewell tour came to an end.

Roddick won the first set and forced a second-set tiebreaker against seventh-seeded Juan Martin del Potro, but he ran out of steam from there, falling 6-7, 7-6, 6-2, 6-4 to conclude a career marked by pace, resolve and charisma.

He rose to prominence by bludgeoning opponents into submission with his booming serve. He enjoyed some of his greatest success during a brief stretch as Roger Federer's primary foil until other rivals eclipsed him. And he fought valiantly to remain in the top 10 in the world for about a decade until injuries and age diminished his serve and forced him to rely more on his oft-inconsistent groundstrokes.

Roddick's career may never have reached the heights many expected, yet he generated many memorable moments during his decade-long run as the face of American men's tennis. Here are eight that will forever be part of his legacy:

1. 2009 Wimbledon Final: No match defined Roddick's career more perfectly than his heart-wrenching five-set classic against the man who always seemed to keep him from reaching tennis immortality. Roddick had lost to Federer convincingly in three previous grand slam finals and 18 of 20 matches in his career at that time, but he never lost his resolve. Trailing two sets to one, he rallied to win the fourth set 6-3 and held serve from behind nine times in the fifth set. Federer didn't exhale until his first service break of the match gave him a win 16-14 in the fifth set for his record 15th grand slam. "I couldn't break Andy until the very, very end," Federer said. "I really thought I had to play my very, very best to come through."

2. 2003 U.S. Open final: Roddick captured his lone grand slam title at age 21 with a memorable display of serving prowess. In a match in which he lost only six first-serve points, Roddick closed it out in style, winning match point with his 22nd ace to clinch a 6-3, 7-6, 6-3 victory over Juan Carlos Ferrero. When a tearful Roddick headed into the stands to find his coach, Brad Gilbert, and his parents, it would have been difficult to believe this would be the only time he experienced this joy. "I'm in disbelief right now," Roddick told reporters afterward. "It's so far-fetched for me. I came here as a fan so much when I was younger. It is an absolute privilege to have my name on the trophy."

3. 2007 Davis Cup: In an era when many top Americans avoided Davis Cup because of the toll it took on their bodies, Roddick embraced the opportunity to represent his country. He boasted a 33-12 all-time record in Davis Cup play, but his greatest success came in 2007 when he won all six matches he played to lead the U.S. team to its most recent title. In the final against Russia, Roddick won his lone match, routing Dimitry Tursunov in straight sets. He and teammates James Blake and Mike and Bob Bryan then showered one-another with beer during the celebration as red, white and blue confetti fell all around them.

4. 2008 Australian Open outburst: If Roddick's booming serve is his most enduring quality, then his penchant for withering sarcasm is certainly a close second. At the Australian Open in 2008, Roddick became incensed with umpire Emmanuel Joseph during a five-set loss to German Philipp Kohlschreiber when Joseph ruled Roddick could not have played a ball that instant replay showed had hit the baseline. Roddick claimed he let it go because of the lines judge's "out" call, prompting this entertaining diatribe. "Do you have to be like a second-grade dropout to be an umpire?" Roddick said. "Did you go to school until you were 8 years old? I think you quit school before you were 10." He then addressed the crowd, adding, "Stay in school kids or you'll end up being an umpire."

5. 2003 Australian Open quarterfinal: At 11-10 in the fifth set against Younes el Aynaoui, Roddick had an opportunity to serve out the match but let it slip through his fingers. It took him another hour to get another one. Roddick won the longest match of his career 4-6, 7-6 (7-5), 4-6, 6-4, 21-19 in one minute short of five hours thanks to his usual blend of powerful serves and occasional forays to the net. "I'm extremely humbled by this victory," he told reporters afterward. "It was really special playing that fifth set. I'm sure Younes and I knew it was something special."

6. 2011 Memphis final: Roddick certainly had won bigger tournaments before, but even he admitted he had never hit a better shot. At match point of a thrilling 7-6 (5), 6-7 (11), 7-5 victory over Milos Raonic, Roddick scrambled after a backhand volley from Raonic that appeared destined to level the final game at deuce. Instead, Roddick left his feet, dove for the ball and somehow uncorked a passing shot winner to avoid a decisive tiebreak and secure the tournament championship. "I don't really remember much else besides the fact that I went for the ball, I hit it, I didn't really think much of it," Roddick said. "Then I heard people cheering. I was like, 'No, there's no way that went in.' I guess it did."

7. 2008 Sony Ericsson Open quarterfinals: Mired in an 11-match losing streak against nemesis Roger Federer, Roddick at last broke through. He turned in an superb quarterfinal performance in Miami, outlasting the world's No. 1-ranked player 7-6 (7-4), 4-6, 6-3. "I figure I was due," Roddick said. "He hadn't missed a ball in a crucial moment for about six years against me. I figured the law of statistics had to come my way eventually." Alas, Roddick didn't have long to enjoy his win. He lost to Nikolay Davydenko in the semifinals.

8. 2012 U.S. Open Round of 16: Roddick may not have unleashed a miracle run in the final tournament of his career, but in fitting fashion he fought valiantly until the finish. Facing match point against him on his own serve, Roddick shook off the emotion of a standing ovation from the crowd and won the next three points on his serve to stave off retirement one more game. In some ways, it didn't matter since del Potro closed out the match on his serve seconds later. In others, it meant everything since the man with perhaps the best serve in men's tennis history shouldn't go out on a service break.


http://sports.yahoo.com/blogs/tennis-bu ... nM-;_ylv=3

_________________
http://www.sportowefakty.pl/tenis

MTT Rank -4 (High Rank -2)

W: Winston-Salem '14 Newport '14 Brisbane '14 Shanghai '13 Beijing '13 Wimbledon '12 Rome '12 Madrid '12 Basel '11 Dubai '11 Sydney '11 Kuala Lumpur '10
F: Bercy'14 AO '14 Eastbourne '12 Barcelona '12 Munich '12 Beijing '11 Bercy '09
SF: Barcelona '14 Stockholm '13 Paris-Bercy '12 Toronto '12 Vienna '11 LA '11 Valencia '10 Moscow '10 Hamburg '10 Belgrade '10 Brisbane '10


Na górę
 Wyświetl profil  
 
PostZamieszczono: 12 wrz 2012, 2:03 
Offline

Rejestracja: 02 sie 2011, 17:20
Posty: 2768
Cytuj:
Andy Roddick should bow out with no regrets

Until my dying day I will remember that game. One game, five shots, 46 seconds. That 46 second game which saw Andy Roddick serve out the US Open of 2003.

There are so many Roddick moments to recall from a distinguished career - I loved the quality and sportsmanship of his epic quarter-final with Younes El Aynouai in Australia earlier that year - but nothing tops that sprint finish to the line at Flushing Meadows.

On a totally green hard court in 2003, before the blue was introduced, Juan Carlos Ferrero managed to get his racket on just one of Roddick's four serves. It was the freedom of an all-American sport-mad kid, just doing his thing.

Roddick, 21, had become a Grand Slam champion and a new American idol, who would end that year as the world number one, had arrived on the international scene.

Fast forward almost nine years and Roddick, on his 30th birthday, found himself announcing his retirement, very calmly and very definitely, to a packed Flushing Meadows press conference.

Friends and family were seated alongside the journalists: Brooklyn Decker, his wife, Larry Stefanki, his coach, Stephen Little, the London taxi driver who drove him randomly one night and became a close friend.

They knew what was coming, the reporters weren't so sure.

Was he pulling out of the tournament? Was it a birthday celebration? Roddick did well to keep the news under wraps and, through the microphones of the media, announced it to the world on his own terms. He deserved that.

Obrazek
Andy Roddick has won 32 career titles in a 12 year professional tennis career.

It was a sudden development, and the twittersphere reacted with shock, but, if we're honest, it had been coming. For a while, Roddick has struggled to live with the intense pace and quality at the top of the men's game. He's not interested in simply "existing", to use his phrase.

Feeling uncompetitive against the best, Roddick put it simply: "It is time," he said.

And, on Thursday, it was impossible to argue with that.

Then we had Friday night.

Roddick thrashed one of the better prospects in the game (supposedly) Bernard Tomic and there were plenty of fans wondering if he'd made a premature call.

The Arthur Ashe night session is Roddick's stage in America. Nobody has played more times under the New York lights. As he whacked, wheeled, bounced and smiled his way to victory, he put the feeble Tomic firmly in his place. (The Aussie was "pathetic" according to US commentator Patrick McEnroe). Does Roddick have one more glorious run left in him?

Whatever happens here, Andy Roddick has been great for tennis. Like Kim Clijsters, also retiring after this year's tournament (she won in mixed doubles last night to prolong her career another day), he will be missed by colleagues, fans and media alike.

We will miss his huge serve, sharp wit, perennial perseverance, even the funny fidgets.

Not a point went by without the right shoulder of his shirt being adjusted. I hope in his next life - in TV studio, office, garden, wherever - he keeps adjusting that shoulder of the shirt and requests a nearby towel.

His press conferences were often legendary. Silly questions would be dispatched to the boundary with tongue-in-cheek disdain. Half-volleys would be snaffled with quick-witted enthusiasm. And he always gave an honest answer.

"How do you rate Gonzalez's chances?" [in the 07 Australian Open Final v Federer].

"Slim."

"What was your favourite press conference?" he was asked last night.

"I don't really rate press conferences. It's not as though I leave the room fist-pumping my way down the corridor after a good one."

Classic, straight-faced, A-Rod.

Earlier, he was on good form on the court. He revealed he got a bit emotional as he walked past a TV studio and a saw a montage of his career. "The sound was down but I'm guessing it was set to an 80s ballad" he quipped.

He loved a bit of chat with an under performing umpire and would try to outwit them at change of ends. Once in Australia, he left the chair advising the crowd: "Stay in college, kids. Otherwise you may become an umpire."

When he needed to be serious, he had no trouble switching gears.

In the past 12 months he has been the most articulate voice of the locker room in the ongoing campaign for a better share of Grand Slam tournament revenues. The players should persuade him to stay as their spokesman and lead negotiations from the sidelines. He has also raised a huge amount of money for charity through his foundation.

Being such a popular player in the UK, it was a disappointment to many that he never won Wimbledon. How he tried.

He came close, especially in 2009, but never managed to avoid Roger Federer, who beat him in three finals. His effort in that marathon All England Club final three years ago was immense and one couldn't help but feel for him as he sat in the runners up chair as Federer paraded yet another trophy. Roddick just wanted to hold it the once.

No regrets though. It was a mighty fine career. Now a new life beckons and he's bound to be a success in whatever field he turns to, which will surely involve talking, a lot of jesting and quite a bit of fidgeting. Good luck Andy.


http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/jonathanover ... ut_pr.html

_________________
http://www.sportowefakty.pl/tenis

MTT Rank -4 (High Rank -2)

W: Winston-Salem '14 Newport '14 Brisbane '14 Shanghai '13 Beijing '13 Wimbledon '12 Rome '12 Madrid '12 Basel '11 Dubai '11 Sydney '11 Kuala Lumpur '10
F: Bercy'14 AO '14 Eastbourne '12 Barcelona '12 Munich '12 Beijing '11 Bercy '09
SF: Barcelona '14 Stockholm '13 Paris-Bercy '12 Toronto '12 Vienna '11 LA '11 Valencia '10 Moscow '10 Hamburg '10 Belgrade '10 Brisbane '10


Na górę
 Wyświetl profil  
 
PostZamieszczono: 12 wrz 2012, 15:28 
Offline
Awatar użytkownika

Rejestracja: 14 wrz 2011, 22:26
Posty: 8605

_________________
"Kto jest dobry? Kto zły? Nie ma ludzi dobrych i złych, są tylko złe albo dobre uczynki. I ludzie, którzy miotają się między nimi." Éric-Emmanuel Schmitt


Na górę
 Wyświetl profil  
 
PostZamieszczono: 13 wrz 2012, 13:27 
Offline
Awatar użytkownika

Rejestracja: 01 sie 2011, 9:05
Posty: 4342
Pojedyncze zagrania godne uwagi:






































_________________
Tytuły (11):
2018: Doha
2017: Szanghaj, Bazylea
2016: Queen's Club, Atlanta
2014: Pekin
2013: Montpellier, Atlanta
2012: Kuala Lumpur, Szanghaj, Bazylea

Finały (16):
2018: Dubaj,
2017: Sofia, Barcelona, s-Hertogenbosch', Wimbledon
2016: Genewa, s-Hertogenbosch
2013: Barcelona, Madryt, Paryż - Bercy
2012: Dubaj, Estoril, Madryt, Rzym, Nicea
2011: Los Angeles

Gra podwójna:

Tytuły (4): Wimbledon’13, Australian Open’15, Roland Garros’15, Us Open'17
Finały (2): Us Open’15, Wimbledon’16


Na górę
 Wyświetl profil  
 
PostZamieszczono: 13 wrz 2012, 13:33 
Offline
Awatar użytkownika

Rejestracja: 01 sie 2011, 9:05
Posty: 4342
Zbiór niesamowitych zagrań:




















_________________
Tytuły (11):
2018: Doha
2017: Szanghaj, Bazylea
2016: Queen's Club, Atlanta
2014: Pekin
2013: Montpellier, Atlanta
2012: Kuala Lumpur, Szanghaj, Bazylea

Finały (16):
2018: Dubaj,
2017: Sofia, Barcelona, s-Hertogenbosch', Wimbledon
2016: Genewa, s-Hertogenbosch
2013: Barcelona, Madryt, Paryż - Bercy
2012: Dubaj, Estoril, Madryt, Rzym, Nicea
2011: Los Angeles

Gra podwójna:

Tytuły (4): Wimbledon’13, Australian Open’15, Roland Garros’15, Us Open'17
Finały (2): Us Open’15, Wimbledon’16


Na górę
 Wyświetl profil  
 
PostZamieszczono: 13 wrz 2012, 13:39 
Offline
Awatar użytkownika

Rejestracja: 01 sie 2011, 9:05
Posty: 4342
Serwis:












_________________
Tytuły (11):
2018: Doha
2017: Szanghaj, Bazylea
2016: Queen's Club, Atlanta
2014: Pekin
2013: Montpellier, Atlanta
2012: Kuala Lumpur, Szanghaj, Bazylea

Finały (16):
2018: Dubaj,
2017: Sofia, Barcelona, s-Hertogenbosch', Wimbledon
2016: Genewa, s-Hertogenbosch
2013: Barcelona, Madryt, Paryż - Bercy
2012: Dubaj, Estoril, Madryt, Rzym, Nicea
2011: Los Angeles

Gra podwójna:

Tytuły (4): Wimbledon’13, Australian Open’15, Roland Garros’15, Us Open'17
Finały (2): Us Open’15, Wimbledon’16


Na górę
 Wyświetl profil  
 
PostZamieszczono: 13 wrz 2012, 13:41 
Offline
Awatar użytkownika

Rejestracja: 01 sie 2011, 9:05
Posty: 4342
Niecodzienne sytuacje:












_________________
Tytuły (11):
2018: Doha
2017: Szanghaj, Bazylea
2016: Queen's Club, Atlanta
2014: Pekin
2013: Montpellier, Atlanta
2012: Kuala Lumpur, Szanghaj, Bazylea

Finały (16):
2018: Dubaj,
2017: Sofia, Barcelona, s-Hertogenbosch', Wimbledon
2016: Genewa, s-Hertogenbosch
2013: Barcelona, Madryt, Paryż - Bercy
2012: Dubaj, Estoril, Madryt, Rzym, Nicea
2011: Los Angeles

Gra podwójna:

Tytuły (4): Wimbledon’13, Australian Open’15, Roland Garros’15, Us Open'17
Finały (2): Us Open’15, Wimbledon’16


Na górę
 Wyświetl profil  
 
PostZamieszczono: 13 wrz 2012, 13:43 
Offline
Awatar użytkownika

Rejestracja: 01 sie 2011, 9:05
Posty: 4342
,,Mroczna strona”:










_________________
Tytuły (11):
2018: Doha
2017: Szanghaj, Bazylea
2016: Queen's Club, Atlanta
2014: Pekin
2013: Montpellier, Atlanta
2012: Kuala Lumpur, Szanghaj, Bazylea

Finały (16):
2018: Dubaj,
2017: Sofia, Barcelona, s-Hertogenbosch', Wimbledon
2016: Genewa, s-Hertogenbosch
2013: Barcelona, Madryt, Paryż - Bercy
2012: Dubaj, Estoril, Madryt, Rzym, Nicea
2011: Los Angeles

Gra podwójna:

Tytuły (4): Wimbledon’13, Australian Open’15, Roland Garros’15, Us Open'17
Finały (2): Us Open’15, Wimbledon’16


Na górę
 Wyświetl profil  
 
PostZamieszczono: 13 wrz 2012, 13:44 
Offline
Awatar użytkownika

Rejestracja: 01 sie 2011, 9:05
Posty: 4342
Konferencje prasowe, wywiady:




















_________________
Tytuły (11):
2018: Doha
2017: Szanghaj, Bazylea
2016: Queen's Club, Atlanta
2014: Pekin
2013: Montpellier, Atlanta
2012: Kuala Lumpur, Szanghaj, Bazylea

Finały (16):
2018: Dubaj,
2017: Sofia, Barcelona, s-Hertogenbosch', Wimbledon
2016: Genewa, s-Hertogenbosch
2013: Barcelona, Madryt, Paryż - Bercy
2012: Dubaj, Estoril, Madryt, Rzym, Nicea
2011: Los Angeles

Gra podwójna:

Tytuły (4): Wimbledon’13, Australian Open’15, Roland Garros’15, Us Open'17
Finały (2): Us Open’15, Wimbledon’16


Na górę
 Wyświetl profil  
 
PostZamieszczono: 13 wrz 2012, 13:47 
Offline
Awatar użytkownika

Rejestracja: 01 sie 2011, 9:05
Posty: 4342
Występy w telewizyjnych programach:














_________________
Tytuły (11):
2018: Doha
2017: Szanghaj, Bazylea
2016: Queen's Club, Atlanta
2014: Pekin
2013: Montpellier, Atlanta
2012: Kuala Lumpur, Szanghaj, Bazylea

Finały (16):
2018: Dubaj,
2017: Sofia, Barcelona, s-Hertogenbosch', Wimbledon
2016: Genewa, s-Hertogenbosch
2013: Barcelona, Madryt, Paryż - Bercy
2012: Dubaj, Estoril, Madryt, Rzym, Nicea
2011: Los Angeles

Gra podwójna:

Tytuły (4): Wimbledon’13, Australian Open’15, Roland Garros’15, Us Open'17
Finały (2): Us Open’15, Wimbledon’16


Na górę
 Wyświetl profil  
 
PostZamieszczono: 13 wrz 2012, 13:48 
Offline
Awatar użytkownika

Rejestracja: 01 sie 2011, 9:05
Posty: 4342
Reklamy:










_________________
Tytuły (11):
2018: Doha
2017: Szanghaj, Bazylea
2016: Queen's Club, Atlanta
2014: Pekin
2013: Montpellier, Atlanta
2012: Kuala Lumpur, Szanghaj, Bazylea

Finały (16):
2018: Dubaj,
2017: Sofia, Barcelona, s-Hertogenbosch', Wimbledon
2016: Genewa, s-Hertogenbosch
2013: Barcelona, Madryt, Paryż - Bercy
2012: Dubaj, Estoril, Madryt, Rzym, Nicea
2011: Los Angeles

Gra podwójna:

Tytuły (4): Wimbledon’13, Australian Open’15, Roland Garros’15, Us Open'17
Finały (2): Us Open’15, Wimbledon’16


Na górę
 Wyświetl profil  
 
PostZamieszczono: 13 wrz 2012, 23:10 
Offline
Moderator
Awatar użytkownika

Rejestracja: 07 sie 2011, 10:08
Posty: 14430
Cytuj:
Amerykanin z krwi i kości

Kilkunastoletnią obecnością w telewizji zapracował na miano showmana, playboya, komedianta i awanturnika. Przede wszystkim był jednak tenisistą: efektownym, specyficznym, pechowym. Gdy uderzył piłkę po raz ostatni, posmutniali nie tylko jego rodacy.

Kiedy zobaczyłem go pierwszy raz, wiedziałem, że jest Amerykaninem. Zdradziła go czapka z daszkiem, znad której wystawały postawione na sztorc włosy, energiczny chód i bijąca na kilometr pewność siebie. Amerykański młokos, który wszędzie się spieszy, błyskawicznie przeskakuje między kolejnymi gemami, nawiązuje kontakt z publicznością za każdym razem, gdy nadarza się ku temu okazja. Mistrz kreowania widowiska.

Zdziwiłem się, gdy przeczytałem, że niedługo przed tym, jak namaszczono go na następcę Pete'a Samprasa i Andre Agassiego, gotów był zrezygnować z kariery tenisisty. Zniechęciła go seria niepowodzeń w rywalizacji juniorskiej. Rozważał porzucenie sportu na rzecz innych zajęć; ze swoją komunikatywnością i inteligencją z pewnością odnalazłby się w wielu branżach. Szczęśliwie, Tarik Benhabiles namówił swojego podopiecznego, żeby dał tenisowi szansę, oddając mu się bezgranicznie przez kolejne cztery miesiące. Tylko cztery miesiące. Poskutkowało. A całkowicie oddany tenisowi Roddick pozostał w grze przez następne trzynaście lat, po drodze stając się czołowym zawodnikiem globu i jedną z najbarwniejszych postaci w zawodowym cyklu.

Gdy zaczął zwyciężać seriami (latem 2003 roku), tenisowi puryści dziwili się, jak to jest możliwe. Poza atomowym serwisem i forhendem nie miał nic. Poruszał się niezgrabnie, nie zachwycał timingiem i wyczuciem, woleje upraszczał do sztuki trafiania w piłkę, a bekhendy służyły mu głównie do podtrzymywania ciągłości wymian. W trudnych momentach wspomagał się walecznością. Wielu trenerom wydawało się nieprawdopodobne, by ten człowiek mógł kiedykolwiek zostać rakietą numer jeden. Ich zdziwienie było ogromne, gdy Roddick zakończył rok na prowadzeniu w rankingu, dystansując rywali pokroju Rogera Federera, Juana Carlosa Ferrero czy Andre Agassiego.

Mniej więcej w połowie swojej przygody z zawodowym tenisem został okrzyknięty najlepiej serwującym zawodnikiem w historii dyscypliny. Przeważnie posyłał mniej asów od dryblasów pokroju Gorana Ivanisevicia, Richarda Krajicka czy Ivo Karlovicia, nie wygrywał podaniem najcenniejszych punktów w karierze – jak Sampras – ale do perfekcji opanował sztukę wprowadzania piłki do gry. Trenerzy namawiali go, żeby czasem przyhamował, uderzył lżej, oszczędzając narażone na potworne obciążenia ramię. Rzadko ich słuchał, wolał rozstrzygać gemy serwisowe po swojemu, najlepiej w czterech huknięciach. Dopiero Brad Gilbert, u boku którego osiągał największe sukcesy, przekonał go do urozmaicenia podania. Wtedy Amerykanin drugi serwis zaczął wprowadzać z kickiem, jakiego jeszcze na kortach nie widziano. Gdyby w serwowaniu organizowano mistrzostwa świata, podzielone na konkurencje związane z precyzją, siłą i sposobem wykonania podania, przez dekadę byłby niekwestionowanym czempionem.

W Stanach Zjednoczonych szybko stał się medialną gwiazdą. Urodą zjednał sobie sympatię kobiet, również tych, które na tenisie szczególnie się nie wyznają. Towarzyskością i wygadaniem zaskarbił sobie sympatię dziennikarzy, choć ci często toczyli z nim zaciekłe debaty, jeżeli ich poglądy stały do siebie w opozycji. Wielokrotnie przewijał się przez najpopularniejsze amerykańskie programy typu talk-show. Błyskawicznie nawiązywał kontakt z prowadzącymi i publiką, odnajdywał się w różnych rodzajach humoru, chętnie żartował z siebie. Najczęściej nabijał się z kompleksu Rogera Federera (przegrał 21 z 24 oficjalnych starć ze Szwajcarem) albo z nieuleczalnej awersji do kortów ceglanych. Raz nawet zgodził się spotkać z Jonathanem Rossem w trakcie trwania Rolanda Garrosa. Kiedy przyjmował zaproszenie do programu, był przekonany, że nie dotrwa do drugiego tygodnia turnieju. Nie mylił się.

Najzabawniej robiło się, kiedy wygłupiał się na korcie. Zdarzyło mu się podrywać Annę Kurnikową, która podczas jednej z licznych pokazówek z udziałem Amerykanina zasiadała na stołku sędziowskim. Bił pokłony przed Agassim, gdy ten, stojąc w korcie, odpowiedział wygrywającym returnem na jego atomowy serwis. Tańczył na Arthur Ashe Stadium, śpiewał, naśladował czołowych zawodników (m.in. Johna McEnroe'a, Agassiego, Lleytona Hewitta), doprowadzając publiczność do łez. Showman pełną gębą.

Nie przepadali za nim niektórzy sędziowie. Zaliczył kilka kortowych wybuchów, po których rugał ich bez opamiętania. - Jesteś idiotą! – warknął na Emmanuela Josepha przed czterema laty na Australian Open, po czym zwrócił się w stronę trybun i dodał: - Uczcie się dzieciaki, bo skończycie jako sędzia. Kiedy wybuchł po popsutym uderzeniu ponad trzy lata później na Indian Wells (co ciekawe, w obu pojedynkach jego rywalem był Philipp Kohlschreiber), stracił punkt, który przesądził o jego porażce. Worek uszczypliwości rozdarł wówczas nad głową Carlosa Bernardesa.

Zafundował tenisowemu światu kilka pojedynków, które niektórzy z lubością będą wspominać jeszcze za kilkanaście, a może i kilkadziesiąt lat. Jako 18-latek stoczył niezapomnianą bitwę z Michaelem Changiem w Paryżu. Skurcze zwalały go z nóg, ale wola walki pchnęła go do zwycięstwa, które Francuzi przyjęli z niebywałym entuzjazmem. Dwa lata później poruszył Melbourne, gdy w starciu ćwierćfinałowym z Younesem El Aynaouim – przy stanie 19:19 – oddał rakietę chłopcu do podawania piłek i zachęcił go, by zagrał zamiast niego. Potem wrócił na kort i wygrał pojedynek, który okazał się jednym z najbardziej osobliwych w dziejach turnieju. W 2009 r. rozegrał jeden z najwspanialszych meczów w historii wielkoszlemowej rywalizacji. W finale Wimbledonu przegrał z Federerem – piąty set zakończył się rezultatem 16:14 dla Szwajcara – choć rozegrał najlepsze spotkanie w karierze. Trudno było znaleźć wówczas w Londynie człowieka, który nie okazałby mu współczucia.

Odkąd ogłosił, że rozstaje się z zawodowym tenisem, kort zacietrzewił się i nie chciał go puścić. Zmiana pokoleniowa miała nastąpić już w spotkaniu z Bernardem Tomicem, ale Roddick rozgniótł australijskiego młokosa, tracąc ledwie siedem gemów. Potem karierę Amerykanina próbował zakończyć Fabio Fognini, który z magicznym wyczuciem przewidywał kierunki serwisów rywala, ale i jemu ta sztuka się nie powiodła. Przyszła kolej na Juana Martina del Potro.

Zanim Argentyńczyk zrobił swoje, niebo nad Nowym Jorkiem zaczęło płakać. Kilkanaście godzin nie mogło pogodzić się z odejściem ostatniego z wielkich amerykańskich tenisistów. Samemu Amerykaninowi przyszło to z niemałym trudem – zanim poległ z del Potro, najpierw wyrwał mu pierwszą partię i był bliski sięgnięcia po drugą. Kiedy nadeszła chwila pożegnania, Roddick łzawym spojrzeniem błądził po trybunach i łamiącym głosem dziękował za wszystko. Smutek przetoczył się przez Arthur Ashe Stadium, zajrzał do wielu amerykańskich domów i redakcji sportowych na całym świecie, którym krnąbrny chłopak z Nebraski przez ponad dekadę gwarantował rozrywkę na najwyższym poziomie.

http://www.tenisklub.pl/publicystyka/fe ... i_i_kosci/

_________________
http://www.sportowefakty.pl/tenis

MTT career highlights (14-8):

2018: Estoril (F), Miami (W), Australian Open (F);
2017: WTF (W), Sztokholm (W), Hamburg (W), Stuttgart (W), Acapulco (W);
2016: WTF (F), Bazylea (F), Cincinnati (W), Roland Garros (F), Marsylia (W), Doha (W);
2015: WTF (W), Bazylea (W), Winston-Salem (W), Hamburg (W), Wimbledon (F), Stuttgart (W), Monte Carlo (F), Indian Wells (F);
2014: Halle (F)


Na górę
 Wyświetl profil  
 
PostZamieszczono: 14 wrz 2012, 1:02 
Offline

Rejestracja: 02 sie 2011, 17:20
Posty: 2768
Cytuj:
Andy Roddick, wielki wojownik o wielkim sercu

Andy Roddick to z pewnością jedna z najbardziej nietuzinkowych postaci tenisowego świata. Z jednej strony niezwykle waleczny i ambitny, z drugiej podchodzący do życia z wielkim humorem i dystansem.

Gdy Andy Roddick w czwartek ogłosił, że po tegorocznym US Open zakończy zawodową karierę, tenisowy świat był w szoku. Po cichu wszyscy spodziewali się, że Amerykanin niedługo powie "pas", jednak nikt nie sądził, że stanie się to tak nagle, bez wcześniejszych zapowiedzi.

- Przez cały rok uważałem, że tutaj [w Nowym Jorku] poczuję, co dalej. Gdy grałem mecz pierwszej rundy, poczułem - powiedział na konferencji prasowej.

Pierwsze znaki pojawiły się podczas Wimbledonu. Gdy Roddick schodził z kortu centralnego po zaciętym, ale ostatecznie przegranym meczu z Davidem Ferrerem, niezwykle ciepło pożegnał się z uwielbiającą go widownią. Jakby wiedział, że to już ostatni raz.

- Nie sądziłem, że jeszcze tam wrócę - wyznał w czwartek. I już nie wróci.

Wraz z całym pokoleniem New Balls, Roddick był kimś znacznie więcej niż tylko znakomitym tenisistą - był społecznym fenomenem.

Come on, Andy!

W swoim pierwszym ćwierćfinale turnieju wielkoszlemowego, Roddick przegrywa z Lleytonem Hewittem w piątym secie 4:5 i serwuje przy równowadze w gemie dziesiątym. Lądujący niezwykle blisko linii bocznej forhend zostaje wywołany jako autowy. Młodziutki chłopak z Nebraski urządza awanturę, której nie powstydziłby się John McEnroe za najlepszych lat, ale sędzia pozostaje niewzruszony, piłka meczowa dla Australijczyka. Na wypełnionym do ostatniego miejsca Arthur Ashe Stadium zawrzało jak w ulu. Faworyt gospodarzy broni dwóch meczboli, ale przy trzeciej minięcie Hewitta odprowadza już tylko wzrokiem.

Roddick dziękuje rywalowi za walkę, a także (owszem, ociągając się) podaje rękę sędziemu głównemu, którego pięć minut wcześniej był gotów zwyzywać od ślepych idiotów. Pierwszą gorzką pigułkę przełknął z godnością. Nie wiedział wtedy, że to dopiero pierwsza z bardzo wielu.

- Chcę podziękować fanom za to, że byli tu ze mną do końca. Lleyton walczył wspaniale, był dziś ode mnie lepszy. Ale jeszcze tu wrócę - zapowiedział w pomeczowym wywiadzie.

Ponad 20 tysięcy kibiców zgromadzonych na wieczornej sesji US Open nagrodziło obu zawodników owacją na stojąco. Poprzeczka wisiała bardzo wysoko, ci sami fani poprzedniego wieczora zgotowali taką samą owację przed tie breakiem czwartego seta pojedynku dwóch herosów: Pete'a Samprasa i Andre Agassiego, którzy rozegrali jeden z najlepszych pojedynków w historii białego sportu.

Był rok 2001. Osiem dni wcześniej Andy Roddick skończył 19 lat.

Społeczny fenomen

Na pierwszy rzut oka ciężko zrozumieć światowy fenomen, jakim był Andy Roddick. Tenis Amerykanina był do bólu wręcz prosty, oparty na potężnym serwisie i niezłej grze zza linii końcowej. Jego forhendowi brakowało lat świetlnych do forhendu Federera i innych specjalistów od tego uderzenia, dziura na bekhendzie w gorszych dniach była wielkości tej ozonowej, a wolej wzbudzał raczej uśmiech politowania niż zachwytu.

Łatwo jest wytłumaczyć armię fanów amerykańskich. Roddick od samego początku kreowany był na następcę największych tenisowych mistrzów, z kończącymi kariery Agassim i Samprasem na czele i z pewnością był największą nadzieją amerykańskiego tenisa.

Poza granicami USA, wielu nie przekonywał jednowymiarowy tenis mistrza US Open. Przez niektórych uważany za skrajnie nudny, nie mający wiele wspólnego z tenisową wirtuozerią, miał sporą grupę przeciwników.

Amerykanina uwielbiano jednak za jego charakter. Determinacja, wola walki i chęć poprawy, żelazne nerwy, a także szczerość i otwartość uczyniły go symbolem tenisisty, który może osiągnąć bardzo wiele, nie będąc wcale technicznym geniuszem. Ta nieustępliwość, razem z atomowym serwisem, z którego pomocą przez 13 lat obronił niezliczoną liczbę break pointów, zostanie przez wszystkich zapamiętana. Nawet tych, którzy grę Jankesa uważali za odrażającą. Dla Roddicka nie było ważne, że z Federerem przegrał wcześniej 20 spotkań. Na każde kolejne wychodził walczyć jak o życie i dać z siebie wszystko na korcie. Był mentorem i wzorem dla całego pokolenia zarówno tenisistów, jak i tenisistek.

Wybuchowy, nie szczędzący gorzkich słów sędziom, rozwalający rakiety, był jednocześnie zawodnikiem grającym bardzo fair, czego wyraz dał chociażby w 2005 roku w Rzymie. W pojedynku z Fernando Verdasco Roddick prowadził 5:3 w drugim secie i miał trzy piłki meczowe przy serwisie rywala. Przy pierwszej z nich i drugim podaniu, sędzia liniowy wywołał podwójny błąd. Gdy Hiszpan szedł już do siatki, amerykański tenisista podszedł do śladu, który po krótkich oględzinach zatarł, uznając, że piłka była dobra. Gdy na pomeczowej konferencji dziennikarze chcieli gloryfikować postawę Roddicka, ten krótko odpowiedział: - To nie było nic niezwykłego, po prostu zaoszczędziłem sędziemu wycieczki. Na pewno podjąłby tę samą decyzję. Roddick spotkanie przegrał.

Nie ma wątpliwości, Amerykanina cały czas byłoby stać na wygrywanie mniejszych imprez (w ostatnich miesiącach wygrał dwa takie turnieje), ale po prostu nie chce wegetować w Tourze jako statysta, tenisista z drugiej półki. Roddick walkę o zwycięstwo ma we krwi. I właśnie takie podejście do życia, w parze z coraz częstszymi i poważniejszymi urazami spowodowały, że w dniu swoich 30. urodzin były lider rankingu ogłosił, że po US Open odwiesza rakietę na kołek.

Decyzja jest jak najbardziej zrozumiała i zasługuje na szacunek. Niepocieszona pozostanie tylko grupa jego miłośników, gotowych wstać o 4 nad ranem, by obejrzeć mecz swojego idola w drugiej rundzie małego turnieju w Atlancie, San Jose czy Delray Beach.

Jeśli tegorocznego US Open nie wygra reprezentant gospodarzy, USA po raz pierwszy w Erze Open nie będzie posiadało aktywnego mistrza wielkoszlemowego.

Ofiara szwajcarskiej precyzji


W 2003 roku Roddick osiągnął wymarzony szczyt. Wygrał kolejno turnieje w Montrealu, Cincinnati oraz wielkoszlemowy US Open, zakończył rok na pozycji lidera. Zdawało się, że tenis doczekał się kolejnego wielkiego dominatora. I doczekał się, tylko nie został nim Roddick, a rok starszy Federer.

Pisząc o Roddicku, nie można uniknąć porównań do Lleytona Hewitta (który podobnie jak Amerykanin osiągnął mniej, niż sugerowały początkowe wyniki). Nie można też nie poruszyć tematu Rogera Federera, największego kata amerykańskiego tenisisty i sprawcy większości jego tenisowych nieszczęść.

Ich konfrontacje często zamieniały się w tenisową lekcję, choć Amerykaninowi nie można było odmówić zacięcia i ambicji. Bazylejczyk czytał podanie rywala jak otwartą książkę, serwisy przekraczające 240 km/h potrafiły wracać na drugą stronę siatki pod samą linię końcową. Federer zabierał Roddickowi jego największy atut, bez którego zostawało niewiele. A do tego nie miał w zwyczaju odpadać we wczesnych fazach turniejów i w większości przypadków droga do końcowego triumfu wiodła przez męczarnie z najniewygodniejszym rywalem.

To Szwajcar czterokrotnie stanął mu na drodze w wielkoszlemowych finałach, w tym w niesamowitym finale Wimbledonu trzy lata temu, kiedy Roddick zmarnował w drugim secie prowadzenie 6-2 w tie breaku, przegrywając ostatecznie 14:16 w piątym secie.

- Przepraszam, Pete, próbowałem go powstrzymać. Naprawdę próbowałem - mówił do obecnego na trybunach Pete'a Samprasa podczas ceremonii zakończenia. Federer wygrał wtedy swój 15. turniej wielkoszlemowy, bijąc rekord amerykańskiej legendy. Bez wątpienia była to najbardziej dotkliwa porażka w jego karierze, z której w zasadzie już się nie otrząsnął, a ukochanego Wimbledonu już nigdy nie wygrał.

Także ten rozdział Roddick zamknął w sposób najlepszy z możliwych. Mimo 21 porażek, w ostatniej konfrontacji z Federerem zwyciężył. W tym roku, w Miami, w III rundzie przerwał passę sześciu kolejnych przegranych ze Szwajcarem, dając w najważniejszych momentach próbkę waleczności i charakteru, a w ostatnim gemie broniąc się ze stanu 15-30 trzema potężnymi serwisami. Federer wygrał 16 poprzednich spotkań w sezonie i jeśli istniała odpowiednia osoba, by go powstrzymać, to był nią właśnie Roddick.

Po meczu... kabaret

O pozakortowych wyczynach Roddicka także krążą legendy. Konferencje prasowe to obecnie przede wszystkim udawana skromność i częste omijanie odpowiedzi na niewygodne pytania. Roddicka nigdy to nie dotyczyło - zawsze bezpośredni, mówiący co myśli (także osobom zadającym głupie pytania, o czym przekonał się pewien dziennikarz w Pekinie). Do historii przeszła już konferencja Amerykanina po przegranym półfinale Australian Open w 2007 roku, kiedy Federer zdemolował go 6:4, 6:0, 6:2.

- Jak czułeś się na koniec meczu?
- Beznadziejnie, żałośnie, jak frajer. Poza tym wszystko było w porządku.

- Co powiedział Ci Jimmy [Connors] po meczu?
- Dał mi piwo.
[...]
- Możesz opowiedzieć nam, co stało się od stanu 4-4 w pierwszym secie? Jest 4-4, Federer właśnie Cię przełamał.
- Tak, przełamał mnie. Potem przełamał mnie jeszcze trzy razy, a w trzecim secie jeszcze dwa razy. 26 minut później było po meczu. Też to widziałeś?
[...]
- Prezentujesz się tu lepiej niż na korcie.
- Osz kurde. Gdyby istniał ranking konferencji, pewnie nie musiałbym martwić się o moje miejsce w Top 5.
[...]
- Jak śpisz po takim wieczorze?
- Zależy od tego, ile jeszcze wypiję.

Potrafił powygłupiać się na korcie z Novakiem Djokoviciem (z którym nota bene do końca kariery był w chłodnych stosunkach, głównie z powodu złośliwych komentarzy odnośnie udawania kontuzji przez Serba), czy dać widzowi szansę by spróbować odebrać jego potężny serwis. Próbowała też Kim Clijsters, z podobnym rezultatem. Innym razem wziął udział w zakładzie: przeciwnik - amator - grał rakietą, Roddick uderzał piłkę... patelnią! Zawsze chętnie występował w charytatywnych meczach pokazowych, nigdy jednak nie obnosząc się nadmiernie ze swoją sławą.

Co dalej?

Reakcje na wieści o zakończeniu kariery były natychmiastowe. Cała plejada największych gwiazd tenisa podziękowała na pomeczowych konferencjach, w telewizji i internecie za bogatą karierę i lata walki, na czele z Jimmym Connorsem, Tracy Austin, Johnem McEnroe, Rogerem Federerem, Sereną Williams i Pam Shriver, choć lista na pewno jest znacznie dłuższa. Komentująca na żywo na antenie ESPN Mary Joe Fernandez miała problemy z pohamowaniem łez i na pewno nie była w tym osamotniona.

Sam Roddick na konferencji był jednak w niezwykle dobrym nastroju, a o płaczu nie było mowy. Amerykanin od 2009 roku jest mężem supermodelki i aktorki Brooklyn Decker (pojawił się nawet u jej boku w jednym filmie), a także od lat poświęca się działalności charytatywnej razem ze swoimi najbliższymi tenisowymi przyjaciółmi: Mardym Fishem i Jamesem Blakiem.

Tenisista z Omahy, dzięki wsparciu swojej fundacji, otworzył niedawno centrum kształcenia dla młodzieży w Austin. - Oczywiście, zdałem sobie sprawę, że moja kariera tenisowa nie będzie trwać wiecznie. Okazja, by zrobić coś dobrego i trwałego w Austin była dla mnie niezwykle ważna - tłumaczył swoje zaangażowanie w projekt.

Roddick w USA ma status absolutnej gwiazdy, więc sympatycy białego sportu z pewnością jeszcze nieraz zobaczą go w programach telewizyjnych, czy usłyszą w komentatorskiej budce. Nie wolno też zapominać, że Amerykanin nie zakończył występu w tegorocznym US Open.

Na czwartkowej konferencji zadeklarował: - Nie zamieniłbym ani minuty. Kochałem każdy dzień mojej kariery. A wraz z nim, miliony fanów na całym świecie.


http://www.sportowefakty.pl/tenis/30765 ... lkim-sercu

_________________
http://www.sportowefakty.pl/tenis

MTT Rank -4 (High Rank -2)

W: Winston-Salem '14 Newport '14 Brisbane '14 Shanghai '13 Beijing '13 Wimbledon '12 Rome '12 Madrid '12 Basel '11 Dubai '11 Sydney '11 Kuala Lumpur '10
F: Bercy'14 AO '14 Eastbourne '12 Barcelona '12 Munich '12 Beijing '11 Bercy '09
SF: Barcelona '14 Stockholm '13 Paris-Bercy '12 Toronto '12 Vienna '11 LA '11 Valencia '10 Moscow '10 Hamburg '10 Belgrade '10 Brisbane '10


Na górę
 Wyświetl profil  
 
PostZamieszczono: 16 wrz 2012, 14:17 
Offline
Awatar użytkownika

Rejestracja: 15 lip 2011, 8:59
Posty: 6120
Cytuj:
Roddick’s farewell

He was the next big thing in American tennis after a decline of “golden generation” born in the early 70s. His emergence onto the tennis scene was thundering, as soon as he appeared in the ATP ranking (2000) he was the strongest player at the American challenger circuit; just twelve months since got his first ATP points, he managed to beat two former Nos. 1 in back-to-back matches (Marcelo Rios, Pete Sampras) in straight sets! Unquestionably the new star was born. Of course, as the most promising player of the United States, he benefited by shortcuts in climbing onto the tennis ladder, receiving “wild cards” in prominent events, but he took advantage of it emphatically. His energy was admirable, actually he had based his game just on two strokes: serve and forehand, but those strokes were working so magnificently that he didn’t need to seek other solutions to win consecutive matches wherever. One-dimensional players tend to find themselves in tight situations more often than others, it was Roddick’s case too, but no problem for him, his self-confidence was so huge that every time he was close to lose his serve in crucial stages of sets or matches, he was able to hit an ace, a service winner or a serve good enough to finish a rally immediately with a powerful forehand. Progressed rapidly, needed only 58 ATP tournaments to have won titles on every surface. His physical preparation was awesome, it manifested most profoundly during the American summer swing in 2003, as he guided by Brad Gilbert (his coach 2003-04) won Indianapolis, afterwards Canadian Open and Cincinnati within two weeks… no-one has repeated it since then (Djokovic was close in the last two seasons), and what’s praiseworthy, A-Rod won those ‘Masters’ tournaments when six wins were required on both cases, not five as it is currently in case of highest seeded players, which to me makes that effort one of the most impressive tennis achievements in the XXI Century. The elevated Roddick was a main favorite to claim US Open ’03 and he didn’t disappoint the USTA and local fans, albeit his route to the title was extremely tough given the quality of opponents (excluding his third round scuffle). Roddick became the best player in the world soon in the consequence of phenomenal hard-court summer (won 27 out of 28 matches in seven weeks!). The sky was the limit… At the time seemed impossible to suppose that UO ’03 would be his first/last major title. In my opinion a key to Roddick’s later regressing, reclines in the Masters 2003 semifinal (Houston) – Roddick was fresh and sharp, but Federer cut him to ribbons on Roddick’s favorite American hardcourt in front of Texanian supporters. The following years confirmed it wasn’t an accident, the Swiss simply figured out a medicine for Roddick’s impetus, overwhelming him with his own best weapon: Roddick’s serve, so effective on a regular basis, was not a threat for Federer at all, in turn Roddick had a bitter pill to swallow – Federer used to serve against him better than against anyone else. Well, who lives by the sword, dies by the sword… It’s really tough to calculate how many important titles Roddick would get if Federer didn’t find an anesthetic, anyway he lost to the Swiss four major finals, two Masters Series finals, and a few other semi- or quarterfinals in prestigious tournaments, which established the most lopsided “Head to head” between players who reached No. 1 in the world. During those quite painful years, Roddick became a more complex player though, he developed variety in his serve, improved volley skills, adapted stable backhand slice – everything in vain – no matter whether he had a mentor in his box (Jimmy Connors 2006-08) or a great tactician (Larry Stefanki 2008-12) the final outcome of confrontations with Federer was the same; even when he was optically better “tennis Gods” were against him (Wimbledon 2009). Roddick in his late 20s, turned from an energetic beast interacting positively with the crowd, into a heavy-sweating moaner, arguing pointlessly with umpires. In the meantime emerged younger and fitter guys like Nadal, Djokovic, Murray, Monfils and Berdych, each of them beating Roddick on several occasions, sometimes harshly, especially in the last twelve months # Those defeats, and the fact of wasting a status of a Top 10 player after nine years, caused Roddick’s decision of retirement. He wasn’t anymore able to compete with the best guys in the world, certainly it’s a blow for someone who aspired to get the biggest titles.

“It’s been a road, a lot of ups, a lot of downs, a lot of great moments. I’ve appreciated your support along the way. I know I certainly haven’t made it easy for you at times, but I really do appreciate it and love you guys with all my heart. Hopefully Ill come back to this place someday and see all of you again.” said 30-year-old Roddick [27] after his farewell match at this year’s US Open, arguably the second best player born in the early 80s (behind Federer).

# Roddick’s bitter defeats to “big 4″ in the last twelve months:

US Open 2011: Nadal 2-6 1-6 3-6
Basel 2011: Federer 3-6 2-6
Paris 2011: Murray 2-6 2-6
Olympics 2012: Djokovic 2-6 1-6

Curiosities:
* won at least one ATP title 12 straight years; got first and last title in Atlanta but on a different surface: clay & hard respectively
* fired a serve which was the fastest over seven years: 249.4 km/h (155 mph) against Vladimir Voltchkov in a Davis Cup semifinal, USA vs. Belarus (2004)
* leader in aces served in years 2003-05
* six times served in a match 35 aces or more
* won the longest set in terms of games at the Australian Open (against Younes El Aynaoui in 2003); despite fantastic experience obtained in that match he never won a match with at least 6-all in the 5th set afterwards, lost in these circumstances eight times (all majors and Davis Cup)
* one of three players in history to win more than 300 tie-breaks (behind Pete Sampras and Roger Federer)
* co-creator of the longest tie-break (lost it 18/20 to Jo-Wilfried Tsonga at Australian Open 2007) – they tied the record for the fifth time in history
* won the most tie-breaks in a row – 18 (February-July 2007)
* four times defeated Ivo Karlovic with the same scoreline: 7-6 7-6, including their last three encounters (5-1 for Roddick in H2H overall)
* won the last match against his toughest opponent – Federer, this year in Miami (3-21 H2H overall, 0-7 in finals)

Andy Roddick in numbers (singles):

32 titles (3 Challengers), 20 finals (1 CH):


Titles:
00 – Austin, Burbank
01 – Atlanta (10), Houston (11), Washington (19) & Waikoloa
02 – Memphis (27), Houston (32)
03 – St. Poelten (56), Queens Club (58), Indianapolis (60), Montreal (62), Cincinnati (63), US OPEN (64)
04 – San Jose (71), Miami (75), Queens Club (79), Indianapiolis (81)
05 – San Jose (90), Houston (94), Queens Club (98), Washington (101), Lyon (106)
06 – Cincinnati (120)
07 – Queens Club (133), Washington (136)
08 – San Jose (143), Dubai (145), Beijing (155)
09 – Memphis (164)
10 – Brisbane (177), Miami (182)
11 – Memphis (196)
12 – Eastbourne (218) & Atlanta (220)

Finals:
02 – Delray Beach, Toronto; 03 – Memphis, Houston; 04 – Houston, WIMBLEDON, Toronto, Bangkok; 05 – WIMBLEDON, Cincinnati; 06 – Indianapolis, US OPEN; 07 – Memphis; 08 – Los Angeles; 09 – Doha, WIMBLEDON, Washington; 10 – San Jose, Indian Wells; 11 – Brisbane

Best Grand Slam results:
Australian Open (semifinalist 2003, 05, 07 & 09; quarter-finalist 2004 & 10)
Wimbledon (runner-up 2004, 05 & 09; semifinalist 2003; quarter-finalist 2007)
US Open (winner 2003; runner-up 2006; quarter-finalist 2001, 02, 04, 07, 08 & 11)

# He was the biggest contributor in reclaiming Davis Cup by the US team in 2007 (6-0 in singles)

# Three-time semifinalist at year-end championships (Houston 2003-04, Shanghai 2007)

Highest ranking: 1 (03.11.2003)

Ranking in years 2000-2011:
158 – 14 – 10 – 1 – 2 – 3 – 6 – 6 – 8 – 7 – 8 – 14.

Win/loss record:
main level: 612/212 (.742)
all levels: 635/220 (.742)

Detailed stats (main level only):

224 tournaments (years 2000-2012)

5-setters: 13-16 (.448)
Tie-breaks: 304-185 (.622)
- deciding 3rd tie-breaks: 26-15 (.634)
m.p. matches: 12-12
Longest winning streak: 19 [2003]
Longest losing streak: 6 [2012]

Longest win: 4 hours, 59 min. Younes El Aynaoui 4-6, 7-6, 4-6, 6-4, 21-19 – Australian Open 2003
Longest defeat: 4 hours, 48 min. Dmitry Tursunov 3-6, 4-6, 7-5, 6-3, 15-17 – Davis Cup 2006
Longest tie-break won: Mardy Fish 7-6(13), 6-4 – San Jose 2004
Longest tie-break lost: Jo-Wilfried Tsonga 6-7(18), 7-6, 6-3, 6-3 – Australian Open 2007

http://voodemar.com/?p=9408


Na górę
 Wyświetl profil  
 
PostZamieszczono: 17 wrz 2012, 7:43 
Offline
Awatar użytkownika

Rejestracja: 01 sie 2011, 9:05
Posty: 4342

_________________
Tytuły (11):
2018: Doha
2017: Szanghaj, Bazylea
2016: Queen's Club, Atlanta
2014: Pekin
2013: Montpellier, Atlanta
2012: Kuala Lumpur, Szanghaj, Bazylea

Finały (16):
2018: Dubaj,
2017: Sofia, Barcelona, s-Hertogenbosch', Wimbledon
2016: Genewa, s-Hertogenbosch
2013: Barcelona, Madryt, Paryż - Bercy
2012: Dubaj, Estoril, Madryt, Rzym, Nicea
2011: Los Angeles

Gra podwójna:

Tytuły (4): Wimbledon’13, Australian Open’15, Roland Garros’15, Us Open'17
Finały (2): Us Open’15, Wimbledon’16


Na górę
 Wyświetl profil  
 
PostZamieszczono: 17 wrz 2012, 10:13 
Offline
Awatar użytkownika

Rejestracja: 15 lip 2011, 8:59
Posty: 6120
Cytuj:
@andyroddick (Andy Roddick)
Guy brought a 20 inch tv into the restaurant, plugged it into the wall, and is watching an Adele concert...... #austintexas

http://www.atpworldtour.com/News/Tennis ... -2012.aspx


Na górę
 Wyświetl profil  
 
PostZamieszczono: 28 wrz 2012, 22:07 
Offline

Rejestracja: 02 sie 2011, 17:20
Posty: 2768
Cytuj:
Andy Roddick masters the media

Obrazek
Andy Roddick bid a fond farewell to the New York crowd after losing in the fourth round of the Open to end his career.

NEW YORK -- After Andy Roddick announced his retirement, the analysis of his career began. He was asked what he will miss the most, what he is most proud of -- and then came the wild-card question.

Roddick was asked about his favorite news conference.

Having covered a number of retirement pressers (Kim Clijsters, Andre Agassi and Pete Sampras), I know you could almost take bets on how long it would be before a player makes a reference to how annoying dealing with the media has been. Sometimes, a player like Roddick will good-naturedly throw the writers a bone about respecting the job the media does, but it's clear that news conferences rank somewhere near being on hold with tech support in terms of fun.

So Roddick's favorite news conference? A reporter prompted Roddick by saying he had one in mind. It was late last Friday night, after a second-round win at the Open, that Roddick stopped playing the game.

"What do you want me to say to make you look better in your story?" Roddick asked. "You tell me. You're searching for something. Maybe we can just cut the s--- and you can tell me what you're looking for."

Roddick, who was not angry so much as direct, had a point. He can be funny, smart, irascible or engaging, depending on the moment, but he isn't always cooperative, nor should he be. I can't count the number of times I've heard -- or said -- "The story is written, now all I need is the quote."

And then a news conference consists of trying to get an athlete to fill in that blank. A question might begin, "Don't you think ... " Or a short preamble from a reporter tries to lead a player to a conclusion already made on deadline.

Tracy Austin, a former tennis great who transitioned into television after her career, said she has experienced that as an athlete, and from the other side. She heard another player say something similar this week.

"You're just asking the same question but you're asking it differently," Austin heard. "Are you looking for a certain answer?"

Sometimes Roddick -- or Serena Williams, or Maria Sharapova, or any number of other savvy, intelligent athletes -- doesn't want to be led.

Are those athletes difficult, or are reporters just playing with them, as though they are fictional characters in a written narrative? There are times when Roddick is right that a reporter isn't listening to his answers as much as looking for confirmation of an opinion already held. Roddick joked with the reporter Friday night that he was finally cool with that now that he's retiring.

"But make up whatever and I'm good with whatever," Roddick said. "No problem. I have no consequences now."

Roddick has been reflective and engaging since announcing his retirement. It's freed him to open up a bit more. His announcement started a bit of a lovefest among Roddick and his fans, the tennis community, and even the media, in its own way.

"Andy is one of the most quotable guys in the history of tennis," Austin said.

Roddick was rarely so easy midcareer, particularly after a loss. After a win, he was revealing and charming, and often extremely funny, with a sardonic wit. But after a defeat, he could be cutting and short, unnecessarily so.

Former player Lindsay Davenport said news conferences aren't easy for every player.

"You know going in there, win or lose, what the tone is going to be," Davenport said. "It's really hard to want to deal with it. Some people let it wear them down, and other people don't. You can see Roger [Federer], even when he wasn't winning every Slam and getting to No. 1, he was still handling it with grace. He's very understanding that everyone has their role to fill and job to do, and he didn't take it personally.

The postmatch news conference may not be the best way to get to know a player, anyway.

Imagine your worst day at the office. Now imagine being asked to stand in front of a group of people who are not your friends, and dissect every mistake. They may ask for reflection, accountability and regret in a three-minute interrogation.

Said Austin, "[Athletes might wonder], is this an attacking question? 'Should you have won more? Could you improve more? Are you retiring?' That's kind of what the job is as of the press. At the same time, you're asking -- we, I guess I'm part of the press -- are asking those questions to someone who has just come off a loss or is dealing with all these things."

Davenport said stepping away from the game gives players more perspective when it comes to the back-and-forth.

"I never felt like I had a strained relationship with the media and I never felt like I had a chip on my shoulder about it," Davenport said. "Other people do, and that's the interesting transition. But I think any player, once they step away from the game, and whether it's one year, three years, four years, you start to see it in a different light, and see there's more that goes into it than just two people playing tennis."

Or, more likely, Roddick might start to look at the media now more as an opportunity than a foe. He already has a sports radio show. Tennis is a sport where the transition from player to commentator is well paved, from personalities as prickly as John McEnroe to Austin and Davenport, who works for the Tennis Channel.

"If he wants that, that world is definitely open for him," Austin said. "It'd be an easy transition."


http://espn.go.com/espnw/more-sports/83 ... final-slam

_________________
http://www.sportowefakty.pl/tenis

MTT Rank -4 (High Rank -2)

W: Winston-Salem '14 Newport '14 Brisbane '14 Shanghai '13 Beijing '13 Wimbledon '12 Rome '12 Madrid '12 Basel '11 Dubai '11 Sydney '11 Kuala Lumpur '10
F: Bercy'14 AO '14 Eastbourne '12 Barcelona '12 Munich '12 Beijing '11 Bercy '09
SF: Barcelona '14 Stockholm '13 Paris-Bercy '12 Toronto '12 Vienna '11 LA '11 Valencia '10 Moscow '10 Hamburg '10 Belgrade '10 Brisbane '10


Na górę
 Wyświetl profil  
 
Wyświetl posty nie starsze niż:  Sortuj wg  
Nowy temat Odpowiedz w temacie  [ Posty: 363 ]  Przejdź na stronę Poprzednia  1 ... 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17 ... 19  Następna

Strefa czasowa UTC+2godz.


Kto jest online

Użytkownicy przeglądający to forum: Nie ma żadnego zarejestrowanego użytkownika i 1 gość


Nie możesz tworzyć nowych tematów
Nie możesz odpowiadać w tematach
Nie możesz zmieniać swoich postów
Nie możesz usuwać swoich postów

Szukaj:
Przejdź do:  
cron
POWERED_BY